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How to Make Homemade Apple Pie Using Gala Apples

Gala Apples in Glass Dish image by Sherri Camp from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

Gala apples are a small variety with a naturally sweet taste. While gala apples are typically considered an eating apple, you can use them in apple pie as well. For the best apple pie with gala apples, use only fresh, unbruised fruit.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.

Unfold your pie crust and roll it out until it is flat. Carefully lay the crust into the pan and gently press it into position with your fingers.

Combine the apples, 3/4 cup of sugar, all purpose flour, cinnamon and nutmeg in a medium bowl and gently mix them together. Pour the apples into the pan. Rinse out the bowl.

  • Gala apples are a small variety with a naturally sweet taste.
  • Combine the apples, 3/4 cup of sugar, all purpose flour, cinnamon and nutmeg in a medium bowl and gently mix them together.

Combine the 1/2 cup of sugar, 1/2 cup of flour and the butter in the bowl and mix it with your hands until it has a crumbly consistency. Sprinkle the crumbs over the pie.

Bake the pie for 45 minutes or until the crumb topping is golden brown.

Gala Apples Ripe?

The Gala is a cross between the Kidd's Orange Red and Golden Delicious apple varieties. Galas grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 10. Because the Gala is an early bloomer, it is also an early fruiter. Owners can expect an initial harvest in mid-August, lasting to the middle of September. The easiest way to tell whether the fruit is ready is by looking at its color. Gala skin has a red-toned pattern on top, and a greenish tone beneath it when unripe, changing to yellow or white when ripe. More specifically, this cultivar appears to require several pickings to even out the fruit's size, color, taste and storage ability. Apples store quite well, and though the Gala is not the best cultivar for storage, it will do alright given a few conditions. Store apples that result from the second, third or fourth picking.

  • Combine the 1/2 cup of sugar, 1/2 cup of flour and the butter in the bowl and mix it with your hands until it has a crumbly consistency.
  • More specifically, this cultivar appears to require several pickings to even out the fruit's size, color, taste and storage ability.
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