Plan the perfect garden with our interactive tool →

How to Transplant a Gladiolus

...
Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Gladiolus is a bright-blooming flower that is especially attractive when planted as clusters. Gladioli have long-lived blooms that do well as cut flowers. The plants typically flower from the middle of summer until the first frost; you can stagger the plantings so that they do not all bloom at once. Transplanting a gladiolus means moving the corm from one location to another. Plant your gladiolus corm in a spot with excellent drainage and full sunlight for the best blooming. Add a layer of mulch to keep the weeds down and retain moisture.

Transplanting From Indoors

Start the corms in mid-April. Place them in a shallow dish filled with 1/4 inch of water.

  • Gladiolus is a bright-blooming flower that is especially attractive when planted as clusters.
  • Plant your gladiolus corm in a spot with excellent drainage and full sunlight for the best blooming.

Place the dish on a windowsill with bright, filtered sunlight. This allows the corm to start germinating.

Plant the corms in the ground, each with its growing tip up, when the weather warms. Bury each corm 5 to 8 inches deep and about five inches apart. If the growing tip is less than 5 inches tall, bury it completely, but take care not to harm the delicate tip.

Transplanting From the Garden

Wait until the blooms are dead after the growing season.

Dig up the corms with a trowel.

  • Place the dish on a windowsill with bright, filtered sunlight.
  • Plant the corms in the ground, each with its growing tip up, when the weather warms.

Clean the excess dirt from the corms, but do not wash them with water.

Place the corms in a paper bag. Leave them in a cool, dry place over the winter, until the first leaves are on the trees in the spring.

Plant the corms in the ground, growing tips up, when the weather warms. Bury each corm between 5 and 8 inches deep. Space the corms five inches apart. Bury the entire growing tip if it's less than 5 inches tall, but be careful not to harm the delicate tip.

  • Clean the excess dirt from the corms, but do not wash them with water.
  • Place the corms in a paper bag.

Transplant A Gladiolus

Cut back the foliage to within 1 inch of the ground after leaves die back naturally in fall. Separate the smaller corms from the sides of the main corms. Throw away any rotten, shriveled or damaged corms. Select a well-drained garden bed that receives all-day sunlight during the spring and summer growing season. Space the corms 3 to 6 inches apart in all directions. Cover the bed with 2 inches of mulch to protect the corms from winter temperature fluctuations. Gladiolus don't require further watering until spring.

  • Cut back the foliage to within 1 inch of the ground after leaves die back naturally in fall.
  • Cover the bed with 2 inches of mulch to protect the corms from winter temperature fluctuations.

Related Articles

How to Prune a Gladiolus
How to Prune a Gladiolus
How to Take Care of Cannas
How to Take Care of Cannas
How to Transplant Crocosmia Lucifer
How to Transplant Crocosmia Lucifer
How to Grow Elephant Ears in Zone 6
How to Grow Elephant Ears in Zone 6
How to Plant Gladiolus
How to Plant Gladiolus
How to Transplant Amaryllis
How to Transplant Amaryllis
Care of Crocosmia
Care of Crocosmia
How to Transplant Garden Mums From Pots Into the Ground
How to Transplant Garden Mums From Pots Into the Ground
How to Grow Gladiolus Bulbs Indoors
How to Grow Gladiolus Bulbs Indoors
How to Grow Non-Stop Begonias
How to Grow Non-Stop Begonias
Why Won't My Gladiolus Bloom?
Why Won't My Gladiolus Bloom?
How to Plant Gladiolas in Pots
How to Plant Gladiolas in Pots
How to Plant Anemone Bulbs
How to Plant Anemone Bulbs
How Does a Gladiolus Reproduce?
How Does a Gladiolus Reproduce?
How to Grow Paperwhites Outside
How to Grow Paperwhites Outside
When to Prune Shasta Daisies
When to Prune Shasta Daisies
How to Prune Canna Lilies
How to Prune Canna Lilies
Care for Cannas in Zone 8
Care for Cannas in Zone 8
Garden Guides
×