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Blackberry vs. Dewberry Fruit

blackberry in bowl
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At a glance, dewberries are sometimes confused with blackberries, but each plant has its own unique features. In its early days, the dewberry plant was derived from the blackberry plant, but it now has about 100 varieties of its own.

Purpose

Bread with Blackberry Jam and fruits
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Both blackberries and dewberries are edible and are mostly used in pies, jams and cobblers, but dewberries are sweeter.

Color

Blackberry
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Unripened berries are a deep red or burgundy. They become the darkest purple or black when they are ripe and ready to eat.

Name

Blackberries
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The blackberry’s scientific name is Rubus, with about 200 species of blackberry and dewberry under this genus. You can call a dewberry a blackberry, but you cannot call a blackberry a dewberry unless that is the specific type.

  • At a glance, dewberries are sometimes confused with blackberries, but each plant has its own unique features.
  • In its early days, the dewberry plant was derived from the blackberry plant, but it now has about 100 varieties of its own.

Features

Blackberries
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Dewberry plants are a perennial sub-shrub that can grow vertically only if supported by something sturdy. Most blackberry plants need minimal support.

Location

Fresh blackberries
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Blackberries grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) climate zones 3 through 7, depending on the specific type of plant. Dewberries are commonly found in zones 5 through 8. Dewberries are not grown naturally outside the United States.

Considerations

Blackberry
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Dewberry plants are considered a nuisance weed by farmers. They are more likely to grow wild than blackberry plants.

  • Dewberry plants are a perennial sub-shrub that can grow vertically only if supported by something sturdy.
  • Dewberry plants are considered a nuisance weed by farmers.

Blackberry Vs. Dewberry Fruit

Dewberries (Rubus trivialis) have a somewhat more purplish-red hue than the darker blackberry (Rubus fruticosus). Much more vertical, blackberries climb to a height of 3 to 6 feet. Dewberries grow in U.S. Dept. of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9, while blackberries have a slightly wider range of zones 5 through 10. Dewberries are somewhat easier to pick because they have slender thorns, while blackberry plants have hard, tough thorns.

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