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How to Propagate a Russian Sage

Perovskia atriplicifolia, also known as Russian sage, is actually neither Russian nor a sage, but it is a garden perennial that can be used as a filler plant. It produces blooms from early spring into the fall that often attract butterflies. The plant received its informal name because its foliage gives off a strong sage-like scent when it is crushed. If you would like to introduce Russian sage to your landscape, aim for around early spring, or wait until early summer to do it another way.

Plan your propagation of Russian sage for the late winter or early spring. Take root cuttings from an existing plant. Select roots from the base of the shrub that are about 1/4 inch in diameter, and use a sharp pruning knife to cut them away.

  • Perovskia atriplicifolia, also known as Russian sage, is actually neither Russian nor a sage, but it is a garden perennial that can be used as a filler plant.

Place the cutting in some prepared potting soil and keep it moist. Once the plants have established themselves, they may be transplanted to an area with well-drained soil and full sunlight.

Cut away some stems from a Russian sage in the early summer to propagate another way. Treat the freshly cut stems with rooting hormone and plant them in containers with a rich mix of potting soil.

Allow the planted stems to become established in a greenhouse or similar humid environment until they are ready for transplanting,

Russian Sage

Featuring clouds of tiny light blue flowers on spikes and finely dissected, fragrant, gray-green leaves, Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) works well for perennial borders, mixed borders, wildlife gardens and other landscape areas. Its two-lipped, tubular flowers appear in summer through fall. Russian sage works well as a perennial border and in mixed borders that include perennials, bulbs, shrubs, evergreens and other plants When paired with evergreens, the plant's blue flowers create an interesting color contrast. When summer's blue flowers fade, Russian sage continues to stand tall in warm climates and add vertical interest to garden beds. The fine, crowded stems of the plant offer shelter to beneficial insects as well. For a natural look, plant your Russian sage in odd-numbered groups of three, five or seven plants. There are, however, still many Russian sage uses. You can also dry complete stalks of the Russian sage plant for use in dried flower arrangements. Russian sage "Filigran" (Perovskia "Filigran") grows 2 to 4 feet tall and 2 to 3 feet wide, featuring lacy silvery foliage, which looks decorative in an ornamental border.

  • Place the cutting in some prepared potting soil and keep it moist.
  • Allow the planted stems to become established in a greenhouse or similar humid environment until they are ready for transplanting, Featuring clouds of tiny light blue flowers on spikes and finely dissected, fragrant, gray-green leaves, Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) works well for perennial borders, mixed borders, wildlife gardens and other landscape areas.

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