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How to Transplant a Braided Money Tree Plant

By Karen Carter ; Updated September 21, 2017

Braided money tree plants are symbols of good luck. These trees are 1 to 7 feet tall and are created by braiding the trunks of three to five plants together. The green leaves on top represent coins and the braided trunks lock the money in place. This plant is given as a gift to celebrate a new house, a business grand opening or an item of decor in feng shui decorating. Braided money tree plants do not require fertilizing. Transplanting this plant into a new pot will provide it with new soil nutrients.

Wash the plant pot with soapy water, then rinse it with part bleach and nine parts water. This eliminates any plant disease and insect pests the container may be carrying.

Drill drainage holes in the bottom of the container if there are none. Braided money tree plants need good drainage to survive.

Cut a piece of screen mesh the same size as the bottom of the plant pot with a pair of scissors, and place it in the bottom of the pot. This prevents the loss of soil through the holes. Cover the mesh with 1 inch of gravel pebbles.

Mix together equal parts of potting soil, peat moss, vermiculite and sand and pour 2 inches of soil over the pebbles. Remove the braided money tree plant from its container and place it in the new pot. Fill the pot the rest of the way with soil.

Firm the soil around the braided money tree plant so it stands up straight. Pour water into the pot until it runs out the bottom.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Braided money tree plant
  • Plant pot
  • Soap
  • Water
  • Bleach
  • Drill
  • Screen mesh
  • Scissors
  • Gravel pebbles
  • Potting soil
  • Peat moss
  • Vermiculite
  • Sand

Tip

  • Set the braided money tree plant in indirect light. Water it once a week to keep it healthy. Mist the plant every other day to increase the humidity and keep dust off the plant's leaves.

Warning

  • The leaves are an indicator of water problems. If they become droopy and yellow, the plant is receiving too much water. If they are wrinkly and curled, the braided money tree plant is not getting enough water. Allow the soil to dry between waterings.

About the Author

 

Karen Carter spent three years as a technology specialist in the public school system and her writing has appeared in the "Willapa Harbor Herald" and the "Rogue College Byline." She has an Associate of Arts from Rogue Community College with a certificate in computer information systems.