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Sweet Herbs & Spices

By Carmel Perez Snyder ; Updated September 21, 2017
Mint is an herb that offers a sweet tastes to food and drink.

Though most gardeners think of using herbs such as garlic and oregano with strong aromatic flavors in soups and sauces, many herbs have a sweeter taste. The sweet herbs are used in desserts, but also add a sweet taste to spicy dishes.

Sweet Basil

Basil leaves have a sweet, peppery flavor.

Sweet basil is a member of the mint family, but its sweet taste is distinct. The bushy plant has bright green aromatic leaves that can be used fresh or dried. Sweet basil has a sweet, peppery flavor.

Mint

The peppermint variety of the mint herb is used in candy.

This green herb's peppermint and spearmint varieties are often used in candy, desserts, drinks and gum. The green herb is easy to grow from seed indoors or outdoors. It is invasive and can quickly take over a garden bed if not contained. There are 25 varieties of the mint. Its leaves are aromatic and have a strong, sweet and cool flavor.

Sweet Cicely

The lacy leaves of the sweet cicely make it a popular perennial in garden beds. It has aromatic leaves that taste as if they've been sprinkled with sugar. The fresh and dried leaves of the herb are used for cooking both desserts and main dishes.

Tarragon

A delicate-looking herb with dark-green, narrow leaves, which can be used fresh or dried. This herb has a mild licorice flavor and is used in cooking.

Rosemary

Used in cooking, rosemary has a sweet taste that is lemony.

The distinctive silver-green leaves of rosemary resemble pine needles, can be used fresh or dried. It is a member of the mint family, and has a sweet taste that is lemony with a hint of pine. It is often used with lamb dishes.

 

About the Author

 

Carmel Perez Snyder is a freelance writer living in Texas. She attended the University of Missouri and has been a journalist and writer for more than 13 years. Her work has appeared in newspapers across the country, the AARP Bulletin and eHow Garden Guides.