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How to Kill Lawn Insects

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For practically every type of lawn, there’s a pest waiting to do some damage. Cutworms, sod webworms, greenbugs and chinch bugs are just a handful of pests that can cause injury to a turf. If you suspect the activity of lawn pests, it’s best to act sooner rather than later. You have three options at your disposal to kill lawn insects. Consider your budget, the cost of treatment and the level of infestation to properly resolve your lawn pest problems.

Locate the damaged area of your lawn. Look for noticeably discolored or wilted areas, two key indicators of lawn pests.

  • For practically every type of lawn, there’s a pest waiting to do some damage.
  • Look for noticeably discolored or wilted areas, two key indicators of lawn pests.

Identify the insect. Take pictures of the bugs if necessary. Consult your local county extension service to help properly identify the pest.

Determine if you will treat the pests by natural or chemical controls.

Apply an insecticide spray on the damaged area according to the manufacturer’s directions. Pyrethrins, Orthene, Dursban and Diazinon are among a few of the most widely used insecticides.

Mix insecticidal soap according to the label directions. Spray the soap directly onto the pests. Apply it during early morning or late evening to avoid the soap evaporating from the heat before it takes effect.

  • Take pictures of the bugs if necessary.
  • Apply an insecticide spray on the damaged area according to the manufacturer’s directions.

Allow natural predatory insects to do the work for you. For every “bad bug”, there’s a “good bug.” For example, ladybugs and wasps are natural predators of greenbugs. Let nature take its course, permitting good insects to eat the harmful insects that are damaging your lawn.

Treat Lawn Fungus & Insects At The Same Time

Water your lawn until the soil is moist 4 to 6 inches down. After 30 minutes of watering, plunge a shovel into the soil and check whether the residue comes up wet. If it does not, aeration is likely needed. Also leave grass clippings on your lawn after mowing. As the plugs and clippings begin to decompose, they will help nourish your lawn and strengthen it against the onset of fungi. Adopt proper mowing techniques. Avoid mowing when your lawn is freshly watered or has been saturated by rainfall. Check that your mower blades are set to an appropriate height -- cutting your lawn too short will weaken it and make it more susceptible to pest takeover. For example, mow horizontally one month, vertically the next, and diagonally the following month. Avoid fertilizing in the hot hummer months. Most manufacturers advise against irrigation for a certain amount of time following treatment -- refer to the instructions printed on your container.

  • Allow natural predatory insects to do the work for you.
  • Check that your mower blades are set to an appropriate height -- cutting your lawn too short will weaken it and make it more susceptible to pest takeover.

Warning

Wear gardening gloves to protect your skin from harsh chemicals. Do not spray any chemicals or soap on a windy day.

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