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How to Propagate Grape Vine Cuttings

By Julie Richards ; Updated September 21, 2017
Propagate grape vines from pencil-size cuttings.
Grapevine image by Tomasz Pawlowski from Fotolia.com

There are three ways to successfully propagate grape vines. The first way is through layering, where one cane is pulled down and partially buried in the soil until roots form. The rooted cane is then severed from the mother plant. The second method is to grow the seeds of the produced grapes, but fruit seed does not always grow true to the parent plant. The final way to propagate grape vines is through rooting grape vine cuttings. Stem cuttings taken from the mother plant produce an identical plant. The cuttings produce healthy grape vines that start to produce fruit as early as the second year of growth.

Choose healthy grape vines no thicker than a pencil from which to gather cuttings. Clip cuttings 4 to 6 inches long using pruning shears for a clean cut.

Remove all but the top two leaves from the cuttings. Trim back the two top leaves to the size of silver dollars. Place the cuttings in water until ready to plant.

Moisten potting soil with warm water and fill a growing tray with soil. Make uniform holes with the dibble or pencil in the soil to plant the cuttings.

Pour 1 tbsp. of rooting hormone into a plastic baggie. Dip the bottom 2 inches of the grape vine cutting into the rooting hormone and place it in the soil of the growing tray. Tamp down the soil to remove any air pockets around the cuttings.

Cover the growing tray with plastic wrap. Do not allow the plastic to touch the grape vine cuttings. Place the tray in a warm area but away from direct sunlight.

Check the grape vine cuttings after two weeks for root development. Give the cuttings a slight tug to feel for resistance, which signifies growing roots. Watch for new growth, which is also a sign of root development.

Transplant the rooting grape vines into separate containers. Over-winter, if necessary, to keep the young vines healthy. Plant the new grape vines into their permanent home in early spring.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Rooting compound
  • Pruning shears
  • Quality potting soil
  • Growing tray
  • Plastic baggie
  • Dibble or pencil
  • Clear plastic wrap

Tip

  • Always use a separate container to apply rooting hormone to keep from contaminating the entire bottle.

Warning

  • Keep the soil moist, but not damp, in the growing tray. If the soil is too wet, the cuttings will rot and die instead of growing roots.

About the Author

 

Julie Richards is a freelance writer from Ohio. She has been writing poetry and short stories for over 30 years, and published a variety of e-books and articles on gardening, small business and farming. She is currently enrolled at Kent State University completing her bachelor's degree in English.