Transplanting Daffodils

Views: 17570 | Last Update: 2009-05-02
Transplanting Daffodils - Provided by eHow
Transplanting daffodils is simple and can be done at anytime of the year when they are not blooming. Learn more about transplanting daffodils and when they do better in the ground or out with tips from a gardening specialist in this free video on plant... View Video Transcript

About this Author

Yolanda Vanveen

Video Transcript

Hi, this is Yolanda Vanveen from vanveenbulbs.com, and next, we're going to learn all about transplanting daffodils. Now, daffodils are one of the first flowers to bloom in the spring. They're so beautiful, and they come in so many gorgeous colors, and shapes, and sizes, and there's short ones, and tall ones. And they can be forced inside in the winter. They can be planted out in the ground in the winter and to bloom in the spring, and they're just the most beautiful flowers. I love them. But how do you transplant them, and when do you transplant them? And my theory pretty much is every plant that can survive the winter can be transplanted any time it's not blooming. So really, daffodils can be transplanted summer, fall, winter, or even early early spring, and they should do really well any time of year. I mix the daffodils with the tulips and the lilies, and they all bloom throughout the year and they do wonderfully. Each spring, I always put some daffodils in some containers, cause' I just think they're so pretty how they are so dainty, and they come up in the containers. By the fall they die back, and the bulbs don't have a lot to em' and they just kind of sit there, so I could leave them in the containers and they'd come back from year to year, but usually what I do is I transplant them back into the ground. So, you take them out of the pots and they're just little bulbs. Right now, they're kind of dormant because they have already bloomed. And I like to plant them in groups of threes, so when I plant them I like to put them in a triangle. Now, this dirt is worked up pretty well so it doesn't take too much for me to dig a a little hole. So, I'm planting them in groups of three in a triangle. Gonna try to put them about three inches deep or zigzag them, but I try to make them into a triangle six inches or even three inches apart, cause' it's not a big area of my garden, and then I kind of just cover them up. It's best not to leave the daffodil bulbs out of the ground for a long period of time because they do, because they will always do better in the ground than out of the ground, or in a container better than out of the container. So, transplant them any time of the year and you'll find that they'll come back and do beautifully every spring for you. It's really easy.