What Time of Year to Plant Grapes

Views: 20172 | Last Update: 2009-04-30
Plant grapes in the winter or early spring before they begin to grow and bloom, or else fruit may be lost for that year. Avoid pruning grape plants too much by leaving the plant a few feet tall with advice from a sustainable gardener in this free video... View Video Transcript

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Yolanda Vanveen

Video Transcript

Hi, this is Yolanda Vanveen, and in this segment, we're going to answer the question, when is the best time to plant grapes? When is the best time to plant my grape plants? Well grape plants are really easy to grow. They're just a vine. They're kind of a bush that grows into a little bit of a vine where you can train the branches. And they're easy to grow in the fact that they need full sun. And good drainage and lots of water. And the best time to transplant them is in the winter or early spring. Because you don't want to transplant them once they've started to grow and they've started to bloom or they have new leaves or when they have fruit on them, because then you'll lose the fruit for that year. So you want to transplant them in the fall when all the foliage is died back and all the grapes have been taken off of them, and there's nothing but stem left. And when you transplant them, be very careful not to cut them back too far to the ground, because sometimes if you cut it all down it won't come back. But then again, it is a root. So even if you do cut it all the way down, most of the time, it will come back. But if possible, leave it a few feet tall so that you've got some main branches coming up that you can trim them back so you're really only trimming down the branches where they're coming in where they're still on the small side. Once they become woody, if you cut it down to that point, it might just die. So you want to make sure that the next year there's going to be some new growth. So basically, cut it back down to the point where there's still some foliage or there was some leaves this year. And just trim it down, cut it away from its supports, dig it up, and leave it at least one foot around or more. Because you're trying not to disturb the roots too much. Because it's better to leave the dirt on the roots and to leave them solid and then turn around and transplant them in a new spot right away. Because if you do cut back the roots too much, sometimes you disturb them too and then you have to wait even longer for them to produce fruit again.