How to Protect Outdoor Plants From Frost

Views: 19460 | Last Update: 2009-05-02
In order to protect garden plants or vegetables from frost, a thin sheet called a row cover can be used to let light and rain through. Consider using a sprinkler to keep outdoor plants from freezing with help from an organic farmer in this free video on... View Video Transcript

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Jarrett Man

Video Transcript

A lot of plants in our gardens are often frost sensitive and can be pretty badly hurt by frost. I'm Jarrett from Stone Soup Farm and I'm going to show you today how to protect your garden plants from frost. Not all garden plants are sensitive to frost but one of them is basil which we are going to do here. Another few common ones are peppers and tomatoes, cucumbers, egg plants, and summer squash. If you are going to have a frost or if you just want to preserve them through the colder days I recommend this kind of stuff. This is sometimes called Reemay or it is sometimes called row cover. It is a very thin sheet that lets a lot of light through and it lets rain through but it keeps sun in. It is sort of like tucking them in for the night and so what we do is we pull them over the bed like this and we take a little bit of soil to hold it down in case the wind comes. We go down the line and pull it over them all like that all the way down. It seems kind of weird but the plants actually like it. It is very regulated in there and it keeps them warm at night. It an provide about three degrees of frost protection so it can get down to 29 degreesish before the basil plants will be seriously hurt. It is not always cost effective to do this sometimes it is more cost effective to use a sprinkler. You can actually prevent damage from light frost by bringing a sprinkler out on a night that it is going to frost and just having it run over the plants. The moving water has a hard time freezing and therefore it prevents the leaves of the plants from freezing. I'm Jarrett from Stone Soup Farm and that's how to protect your plants from frost.