Cotoneaster (Integerrimus)

Leaves are not retained year to year.

Uses of : Landscaping, Medicinal, Culinary, etc.

Conservation: The USDA NRCS recommends cotoneaster for use in windbreak plantings on farmsteads and along transportation, transmission, and recreation corridors.

Wildlife: Many bird species consume cotoneaster fruit in autumn. The plant also offers protection and habitat to small wildlife species.

Description General: Rose Family (Rosaceae). Cotoneaster is a multi-branched shrub with a broad crown. It is 2 m tall at maturity. The branchlets are grayish brown, covered with dense hairs, becoming more glabrous at maturity. Leaves are simple, alternate, broadly ovate to almost circular, 2 to 4 cm long and 1 to 3 cm wide. They are gray-green above, gray pubescent below, and are untoothed. Buds are brown to pale gray and less than 1 cm long. Two to five flowers are borne

on inflorescences that are 1.5 to 2.5 cm long. The flowers are pinkish-white and approximately 8 mm in diameter. The fruit is a dark red berry, 6 to 8 mm in diameter. Cotoneaster blooms in May and June and sets fruit in August and September.

Distribution: Cotoneaster is native to Europe and temperate regions of Asia. Its native

General Characteristics

General: Rose Family (Rosaceae). Cotoneaster is a multi-branched shrub with a broad crown. It is 2 m tall at maturity. The branchlets are grayish brown, covered with dense hairs, becoming more glabrous at maturity. Leaves are simple, alternate, broadly ovate to almost circular, 2 to 4 cm long and 1 to 3 cm wide. They are gray-green above, gray pubescent below, and are untoothed. Buds are brown to pale gray and less than 1 cm long. Two to five flowers are borne

on inflorescences that are 1.5 to 2.5 cm long. The flowers are pinkish-white and approximately 8 mm in diameter. The fruit is a dark red berry, 6 to 8 mm in diameter. Cotoneaster blooms in May and June and sets fruit in August and September.

General Upkeep and Control

To reduce the risk of fireblight infection do not plant cotoneaster near ornamental or orchard apple trees. Although there is no chemical treatment available, sanitary culture conditions can manage fireblight spread. Prune diseased twigs and remove plants with large cankers. Disinfect pruning tools. Apply sprays that contain fixed copper during bloom-time to prevent infection. Remove suckers from the base of the plant.

Pear slug infestation is controlled with insecticides labeled for caterpillars or leaf beetles, or by using a jet of water to remove the slugs. Wood ashes kill pear slugs.

Plant Basics
Category
Plant Nativity Cultivated, or not in the U.S.
Physical Characteristics
Displays Fall Colors No
Flower Conspicuousness No
Gardening Characteristics
Cold Stratification Required No
Toxic to Nearby Plants No
Toxic to Livestock No
After-Harvest Resprout Ability No
Responds to Coppicing No
Growth Requirements
pH Range 0–0 pH
Precipitation Range 0–0 inches/yr
Planting Density 0–0 indiv./acre
Minimum Frost-Free Days 0 day(s)
Sustainability & Use
Leaf Retention No
Fire Resistant No

Source: USDA, NRCS, PLANTS Database, plants.usda.gov.
National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA