How to Eat Zucchini Blossoms

Overview

If your garden is producing more zucchini than you know what to do with, and the zucchini is turning from tender little veggies to boat-sized beauties overnight, consider eating a few of the zucchini blooms.The bright yellow flowers, which taste similar to the zucchini vegetable, will add pizazz to any meal. Zucchini blooms are perfectly safe to eat, and are commonplace in many Mediterranean dishes, usually stuffed with cheese and baked, sauteed or fried like fritters.

Step 1

Harvest zucchini blooms in late morning, after the dew has evaporated, but before the heat of the day. Choose blossoms that are just barely fully opened, but not yet beginning to fade and wilt.

Step 2

Wash the zucchini blossoms under cool running water. Place the blossoms between paper towels to remove the excess water.

Step 3

Place the zucchini flowers in a zip-lock bag with a damp paper towel if you aren't ready to prepare the flowers right away. If possible, use the blooms the same day they are picked.

Step 4

Dip the blooms in flour seasoned with salt and pepper. If desired, put a chunk of cheese or a spoonful of breadcrumbs inside the blooms. Dip the blooms in a beaten egg and fry them on both sides in butter, olive oil or vegetable oil. You can also put the zucchini blossoms in a baking pan and bake them at 400 degrees F until they're brown and crispy.

Tips and Warnings

  • Never eat zucchini flowers that have been treated with pesticides, insecticides or other chemicals. If you aren't sure that the zucchini is untreated, don't eat the blossoms.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper towels
  • Zip-lock bag
  • Flour
  • Salt and pepper
  • Egg
  • Butter, olive oil or vegetable oil
  • Cheese or bread crumbs

References

  • Texas A&M University: Edible Flowers
  • N.C. State University: Edible Flowers
  • University of Florida: Edible Flowers--Quick Fact
Keywords: zucchini flowers, zucchini blossoms, eat zucchini blossoms

About this Author

M.H. Dyer is a long-time writer, editor and proofreader. She has been a contributor to the East-Oregonian Newspaper and See Jane Run magazine, and is author of a memoir, “The Tumbleweed Chronicles, a Sideways Look at Life." She holds an Master of Fine Arts from National University, San Diego.