• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Dry Blackberries

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Dry Blackberries

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Blackberry shrubs, whether they're wild in a field or purposely grown in your backyard, produce a bounty of the shrub's iconic black fruit. Collect the fruit fresh for delicious eating, and dry the excess so you can enjoy blackberries long after the shrub has stopped producing fruit. Dried blackberries can be consumed on their own or added to salads, trail mix and other recipes.

Step 1

Pluck the stems from the fresh blackberries. Rinse the berries under cold running water to remove any dirt or debris on the fruit.

Step 2

Turn on your oven and set the temperature to 140 degrees F.

Step 3

Spray a cookie sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Scatter the washed blackberries on the cookie sheet. Arrange the berries so that they are not touching each other.

Step 4

Position an oven-safe thermometer on the cookie sheet and put the cookie sheet in the oven. Keep the oven door open approximately 6 inches to let the humid air inside escape.

Step 5

Review the thermometer. Because the oven door is open, the temperature inside may fluctuate. Adjust the oven's thermostat to keep the temperature inside at 140 degrees F.

Step 6

Remove the blackberries when they are shriveled in appearance and chewy in texture. This will take several hours, depending on the size of the blackberries, their moisture content and the general humidity of your home.

Things You'll Need

  • Fresh blackberries
  • Cookie sheet
  • Nonstick spray
  • Oven
  • Oven-safe thermometer

References

  • "Preserving Summer's Bounty: A Quick and Easy Guide to Freezing, Canning, and Preserving, and Drying What You Grow"; Susan McClure; 1998
  • "The Farmer's Wife Guide To Fabulous Fruits And Berries: Growing, Storing, Freezing, and Cooking Your Own Fruits and Berries"; Barbara Doyen; 2002
Keywords: drying blackberries, preserve blackberries, dehydrate blackberries

About this Author

Josh Duvauchelle is an editor and journalist with more than 10 years' experience. His work has appeared in various magazines, including "Honolulu Magazine," which has more paid subscribers than any other magazine in Hawaii. He graduated with honors from Trinity Western University, holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional communications, and earned a certificate in applied leadership and public affairs from the Laurentian Leadership Centre.