How to Repair Garden Hoses

Overview

Sometimes duct tape just won't fix everything. Whether a washer has worn out, the hose burst because you left the water on, or you ran over the end with the car, it's best to repair a garden hose with a new fitting. You normally can purchase a universal hose repair kit for less than $7 (as of March 2010) at any garden center. Buy one before you fix your hose. You'll be able to repair three leaks types on most any diameter hose.

End Coupling Repairs

Step 1

Look at the damaged or leaky coupling and determine whether it is a male or female coupling. Choose the correct replacement from your universal kit.

Step 2

Cut the hose with pruning shears about an inch away from the old coupling. Make sure the cut is straight and clean.

Step 3

Loosen the two screws on the clamp piece of the repair coupling. Turn the screwdriver clockwise on each screw until the clamp opens wide enough to slide over the end of the cut hose. Don't completely separate the two clamp pieces. Slide the loosened clamp over the end of the hose, and back a few inches.

Step 4

Insert the cut hose end into the bucket of hot, soapy water for about 60 seconds. Grasp the hose in one hand and twist the barbed end of the nipple piece into the hose opening until it fits securely.

Step 5

Slide one loose clamp back toward the nipple until it stops. Tighten the clamp screws a few turns each at a time with the screwdriver until the clamp is as tight as possible around the hose and nipple.

Step 6

Connect the hose to the water source, turn on the water and check for leaks.

Cracked Hose Repairs

Step 1

Turn on the water to determine where the leak is located. From your repair kit, choose the fittings connected by a nipple with barbs on both ends to make this repair. Turn off the water.

Step 2

Make two clean, straight cuts with pruning shears--one on each side, about an inch from the leak.

Step 3

Loosen the two screws on each clamp piece of the repair coupling. Turn the screwdriver clockwise on each screw until the clamps open wide enough to slide over the end of the cut hose. Don't completely separate the two clamp pieces. Separate the barbed nipple from the two clamps. Slide one loosened clamp over each of the two cut hose ends.

Step 4

Insert one cut hose end into the hot, soapy water for about 60 seconds. Grasp the hose in one hand and twist one end of the barbed nipple into the hose opening until it won't go any further. Repeat the process for the other hose end. The two cut hose ends should now be connected by the two sides of the barbed nipple.

Step 5

Slide one loose clamp back toward the nipple until it stops. Tighten the clamp screws a few turns each at a time with the screwdriver until the clamp is as tight as possible around the hose and nipple. Do the same for the other clamp.

Step 6

Connect the hose to the water source, turn on the water and check for leaks.

Things You'll Need

  • Universal plastic hose repair kit
  • Phillips-head screwdriver
  • Garden pruning shears
  • Bucket of hot, soapy water

References

  • Community Online: Repairing Garden Hoses
Keywords: garden hose repair, hose repair kits, leaking garden hose

About this Author

Aaron Painter began as a garden writer in 1999, publishing in "Louisiana Gardener" and "Baton Rouge House and Home" magazines. He has more than 10 years of professional experience in landscaping and horticulture and six years in broadcast journalism. Painter holds a B.A. in mass communication and horticulture from LSU, and now lives in Nashville, Tenn.