Lavender Plants for Indoors

Herbalists and gardeners often fill their yards with sweet-smelling lavender plants. This herb is harvested for its dried flowers and essential oils, which are made into sachets and perfumes. Despite its Mediterranean heritage, lavender can be grown indoors if given well-drained soil, allowed to dry out between waterings and exposed to at least six hours of full sun each day.

French

French lavender (L. dentata) can grow 2 to 3 feet tall and wide. According to the Arizona Cooperative Extension, it's one of the longest-blooming lavenders. Its flowers first appear in early spring and continue through the end of summer. Removing faded flower spikes will extend the bloom time. Its fernlike, gray-green leaves have square-toothed edges. French lavender is hardy in USDA zones 8 to 10, so you may move your pot outside during the summer.

Goodwin Creek Grey

The Goodwin Creek Grey (L. spp.), a cross between two French lavenders, thrives indoors. Its deep blue flowers bloom in March and April, and its foliage is tangy and pungent. The plant can reach 12 to 18 inches tall. The Goodwin Creek Grey is hardy to USDA zone 7.

Hidcote Blue

Hidcote Blue lavender (L. angustifolia) is a compact plant, growing only 10 to 12 inches tall. It has darker foliage and deeper blue flowers than most lavenders. The Hidcote Blue blooms from June to August, and it is hardy to USDA zone 5.

Irene Doyle

The Irene Doyle (L. angustifolia) is an English lavender cultivar that grows to 20 inches. Its 8-inch stems have medium purple, fragrant flowers. It blooms in June, and again in September through mid-fall. The Irene Doyle is hardy in USDA zones 5 to 9.

Keywords: lavender plants indoors, houseplants for sunny windows, growing lavandula

About this Author

Aileen Clarkson has been an award-winning editor and reporter for more than 20 years. Clarkson graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She has worked for several newspapers, including "The Washington Post" and "The Charlotte Observer."