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Types of South American Flowers

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Types of South American Flowers

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The continent of South America is home to a wide variety of exotic flora. From curious meat-eating rarities to grandiose and vibrantly colored blossoms, every nook and cranny of the region is flush with colorful vegetation. A botanical paradise lies before visitors and residents of South America.

Cantuta

The national flower of Peru, cantuta or sacred flower of the Incas, thrives throughout South America and makes for an excellent landscape border bush. Identified by its numerous branches of olive green foliage and clusters of red, tube-like blossoms, the cantuta flower makes for an elegant addition to your garden landscape. Drought tolerant and sun-thriving, cantuta doesn't require deeply enriched soil. Loamy soil with plenty of drainage gives cantuta plants the chance to survive in a variety of warm climates.

Ceibo

A small flowering tree, the ceibo is also known as the Erythrina crista-galli and the flower of the tree is the national flower of Argentina. The velvety, exotic looking flowers vary in color from light crimson to deep blood red, and the deep-green foliage of the branches provide an excellent touch of color to your home landscape. Propagated by cuttings obtained from a reliable source, ceibo trees thrive in rocky soil with weekly waterings equaling up to 20 gallons of water at a time.

Ipe

The national flower of Brazil, Ipe comes from the trumpet tree. Comprised of many species, the trees from which the Ipe flower blooms range from deciduous to evergreen in nature. The flowers range in color from bright yellow, which is the most common, to lavender and white. Loamy soil with plenty of sunlight and moisture make the Ipe flowers bloom, even after the leaves have fallen from the deciduous species of trumpet tree. It can be propagated by cuttings which are rooted in a solution before being planted into a large planter or directly into the earth.

Keywords: South American flora, flowers in South America, exotic plants

About this Author

Chelsea Hoffman is a professional freelance writer with works published both on the Web and in print. She currently resides in Las Vegas. The author of the new series of horror novellas, titled "Fear Chronicles," Hoffman's work can also be found on environmental websites like Dobegreen.com, where she helps spread environmental awareness with her mighty pen.

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