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How to Anchor Landscape Timbers

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How to Anchor Landscape Timbers

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Overview

When you install landscape timbers in a home landscaping project, it is imperative that the timbers stay where you put them. Anchor landscape timbers with galvanized spikes, driving the spikes through the ends of the timbers and into the soil underneath. The spikes will hold the landscape timbers in place and prevent them from shifting over time. This foundation work will ensure a solid perimeter to your flower or vegetable garden.

Step 1

Remove any grass or other ground cover from the ground along the area where you will be installing the landscape timbers. Remove this growth by skimming the shovel along the surface of the soil and discarding the plants.

Step 2

Drill holes approximately 6 inches from both ends of the landscape timbers. Make the holes large enough to serve as pilot holes for the spikes and angle the holes at 20-degree angles (toward the center of the landscape timbers).

Step 3

Place the landscape timbers in place along the perimeter you prepared. Check the landscape timbers with the level to ensure they are level. If areas are not level, remove the timbers and add a small amount of topsoil to level them. Continue checking the timbers with the level until every timber is perfectly level.

Step 4

Drive the galvanized spikes through the pilot holes you created with the drill. Pound the spikes through the timbers until they are even and flush with the tops of the landscape timbers. Install every landscape timber in this same fashion.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Landscape timbers
  • Drill (with drill bit)
  • Level
  • Galvanized spikes (at least 1 foot long)
  • Hammer

References

  • The Garden Helper: Raised Beds
Keywords: install landscape timbers, anchor landscape timbers, galvanized spikes

About this Author

Kathryn Hatter is a 42-year-old veteran homeschool educator and regular contributor to Natural News. She is an accomplished gardener, seamstress, quilter, painter, cook, decorator, digital graphics creator and she enjoys technical and computer gadgets. She began writing for Internet publications in 2007. She is interested in natural health and hopes to continue her formal education in the health field (nursing) when family commitments will allow.