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How to Mix Organic Soil

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How to Mix Organic Soil

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Overview

Numerous recipes for mixing organic soil exist. The key is to have a good compost base that makes up at least 20 percent to 50 percent of the organic soil. The remaining ingredients can be experimented with and should contain nitrogen and phosphorous. All organic soil mixes must be thoroughly moistened one week prior to any use, as the nitrogen component will give off ammonia gas that can kill young seedlings.

Step 1

Clean the wheelbarrow thoroughly of any foreign debris that may contaminate the organic soil mix. Allow the interior of the wheelbarrow to completely dry in a sunny area.

Step 2

Add approximately five shovel fulls of compost to the wheelbarrow.

Step 3

Add two shovel fulls of the sphagnum moss to the compost.

Step 4

Mix in 2 cups of blood meal and 2 cups of bone meal.

Step 5

Use the garden hoe and thoroughly mix the dry ingredients.

Step 6

Add water from the garden hose to the top of the mixture, and combine everything until it is moist. Allow the ingredients to set for up to a week so the ammonia gas created by the blood meal (or other nitrogen component) can dissipate.

Step 7

Store the organic mixture in a sealed storage container. Excess moisture should be kept from the organic soil mix so the nutrients do not leach from the soil.

Things You'll Need

  • Wheelbarrow
  • Shovel
  • Compost
  • Sphagnum moss
  • Blood meal (or other nitrogen component)
  • Bone meal
  • Garden hoe
  • Garden hose
  • Sealed storage container

References

  • University of Vermont: Organic Potting Mixes
  • Oregon State University: Growing Your Own

Who Can Help

  • Attra: Potting Mixes for Certified Organic Production
Keywords: mix organic soil, organic soil mix, make organic mixture

About this Author

G. K. Bayne is a freelance writer, currently writing for Demand Studios where her expertise in back-to-basics, computers and electrical equipment are the basis of her body of work. Bayne began her writing career in 1975 and has written for Demand since 2007.