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How to Store Home Grown Potatoes

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How to Store Home Grown Potatoes

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Overview

Keep your home-grown spuds lasting longer in storage. Growing your own potatoes rewards you with edible vegetables which store well for extended periods of time. But if improperly prepared for storage, potatoes from your garden will not last as long as those from the grocery store. During harvest, damage to the tubers can occur, and you need to help the potatoes to harden themselves against this harm before putting them into a root cellar. Correctly kept potatoes will last for up to eight months in cool storage conditions.

Step 1

Wait for the vines to naturally die back before harvesting the potatoes by refusing to water the plant after it flowers.

Step 2

Wash off any dirt and completely dry the potatoes.

Step 3

Use your humidity meter (hygrometer) and thermometer to locate an area where the temperature remains at 65 degrees Fahrenheit and the humidity stands between 85 and 95 percent. Store your potatoes in this location for 10 days.

Step 4

Separate and discard any discolored, green or diseased potatoes.

Step 5

Move your potatoes to a cooler, drier and completely dark spot with a temperature range of 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit and low to moderate humidity levels. Keep your potatoes in this cooler storage for seven to eight months.

Things You'll Need

  • Home-grown potatoes
  • Humidity meter (hygrometer)
  • Thermometer

References

  • Ohio State University: Hints for Storing Home Grown Potatoes
Keywords: potatoes, root vegetable, potato storage

About this Author

Athena Hessong began her freelance writing career in 2004. She draws upon experiences and knowledge gained from teaching all high school subjects for seven years. Hessong earned a Bachelor's in Arts in history from the University of Houston and is a current member of the Society of Professional Journalists.