• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Root Perennial Flowers

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Root Perennial Flowers

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Rooting perennial flowers is a simple and money-saving way to grow new plants for your garden. Most perennial flowers root quickly and easily from stem cuttings. In addition, rooted plants mature and produce flowers sooner than plants grown from seed. Rooting is usually done in the spring or summer, although some plants will also root in the fall.

Step 1

Mix together equal parts of perlite and peat moss. Fill a planting tray or a 4- to 6-inch pot with the planting medium.

Step 2

Choose a healthy side shoot on the parent plant. Use a sharp knife or hand pruners to cut a 4- to 6-inch long piece of stem just below the leaf node. Place the cuttings in a plastic bag with a wet paper towel to keep them fresh until you are ready to plant them.

Step 3

Remove the leaves from the bottom 2/3 of the cutting with your fingers, or the knife or pruners. If the leaves are large, cut the remaining leaves in half to reduce moisture loss. Coat the bottom of the cutting with rooting hormone and insert the cutting into the planting medium in the tray or pot.

Step 4

Repeat the process for each cutting. Several cuttings can be rooted in each tray or pot, depending on the size of the leaves on the cuttings and the size of the container.

Step 5

Water the containers and use your fingers to firm the planting medium around each cutting. Set the cuttings in indirect light inside, or in a shady location outside.

Step 6

Make a tent over the cuttings with clear plastic and small wooden stakes. Do not let the plastic touch the cuttings. Prop the tent up 1 to 2 inches every two or three days to allow excess moisture out.

Step 7

Check the cuttings for roots when new growth appears. Gently pull a cutting out of the planting medium. If it has roots, transplant it to a 4- to 6-inch pot of potting soil. Keep it in a partly shady location and continue watering it until the new plant is big enough to plant in the garden or a larger container.

Things You'll Need

  • Perlite
  • Peat moss
  • Tray or 4- to 6-inch pot
  • Knife or hand pruners
  • Plastic bag
  • Wet paper towel
  • Rooting hormone
  • Clear plastic
  • Small wooden stakes
  • Potting soil

References

  • Virginia Tech: Perennials -- Culture, Maintenance and Propagation

Who Can Help

  • Perry's Perennial Pages: Propagation Methods For Herbaceous Perennials
  • Washington State University: Propagating Perennials
Keywords: root perennial flowers, root perennial cuttings, perennial cuttings

About this Author

Melody Lee worked as a newspaper reporter, copywriter and editor for 5 years. In addition, she has edited magazine articles and books. Lee holds a degree in landscape design and is a Florida master gardener. She has more than 25 years of gardening experience, which includes working at nurseries and greenhouses.

Member Calendar Entries