Birch Trees in Wisconsin

There are a few cultivars of Birch trees in Wisconsin. Identification between the different types of Birch trees can be challenging. Many look similar in features and characteristics. However, each birch tree has a slightly different look that enables you to quickly make an identity.

Heart-Leaved Birch

The Heart-Leaved birch is located in Wisconsin and other northerly regions of the United States and Canada. The distinguishing feature of the Heart-Leaved birch tree is the shape of the green leaves being almost a perfect heart. The bark of this tree is similar to other birch trees. It is white and very thin. It looks like sheets of white paper have been wrapped around the tree.

Paper Birch

Tree enthusiasts can find the Paper birch tree in Wisconsin. This tree looks similar to the heart-leaved birch. The distinguishing feature of the Paper birch is the white to almost gray bark that remains on the tree even after it matures. The tree requires moist soil that is moderately rich in nutrients. According to the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Center, the Paper birch tree likes soil with in the PH between 4.2 to 7.4 ranges. The tree grows an average of 2 feet per year.

River Birch

As the name might sound, the River birch is most often found in Wisconsin in the flood plain regions of the state. The young River birch trees have a paper bark, as other birches. However, the distinguishing feature of the River birch is the bark of the young trees is often pinkish in coloring. This turns to regular gray bark with deep crevices that often retain some of the pink color as the River birch ages.

Weeping Birch

According to the Herbarium Cofrin Center of Biodiversity, the Weeping birch tree is mainly grown in the state of Wisconsin. The double-serrated leaves of the Weeping birch fold toward the ground thin branches. The tree appears to be weeping. During the fall the leaves turn a brilliant yellow. The Weeping Birch grows slowly and reaches a maximum height of 20 to 25 feet.

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About this Author

Daniel Smith graduated from technical school in 1993 and has been writing since 2005. His has written numerous articles for the instructional website called eHow in areas including gardening, home improvement, celebrating special events and health-related topics.