Propagating Aloe

Overview

Aloe is typically propagated from leaf cuttings. It is a succulent plant, which is made up of 99 percent water. It has been used for over a thousand years to heal burns and wounds. An aloe plant can grow up to 4 feet tall with leaves reaching as long as 36 inches. Aloe often propagates itself, but you can take your own leaf cuttings so you can clone your aloe plants whenever you want to.

Step 1

Clean your pruning scissors with rubbing alcohol to prevent any bacteria or disease from being spread to your new aloe cuttings.

Step 2

Choose a healthy-looking leaf from the lower part of your aloe plant that you would like to use to propagate a new plant. The leaf should be at least 4 inches long.

Step 3

Use your scissors to cut the base of the leaf where it connects to the plant to remove it. Use a paper towel to grab the leaf. Avoid touching it with your hands.

Step 4

Set your leaf cutting aside for a week to let the wound you made callus over. This helps to prevent the leaf from rotting.

Step 5

Dip the cut end of your leaf into your rooting hormone for about 30 seconds. Fill your plant pot with well-drained potting soil.

Step 6

Bury the bottom half of the leaf in the potting soil so that it can form new roots. Water your plant lightly to moisten the soil every three days for a month. Reduce watering to once a month after the first month.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning scissors
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Aloe plant
  • Paper towel
  • Rooting hormone
  • Potting soil

References

  • Cass County Extension: Starting New Plants
  • Flower Shop Network: House Plant Propagation
  • University of Maryland: Aloe
Keywords: growing aloe, taking a leaf cutting, planting aloe plants

About this Author

Based in Ann Arbor, Mich., Robin Coe has reported on a variety of subjects for more than 15 years. Coe has worked on environmental health and safety issues in communities across Ohio and Michigan. Coe holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism with a double-major in international politics from Bowling Green State University. She has also received training and experience as a nurse aide.