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Fruit and Nut Trees in Washington

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Fruit and Nut Trees in Washington

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The climate in Washington state is conducive to many types of fruits and nuts. Many trees will grow equally well both on the east side of the Cascade mountains and on the west side. Although Washington is known most for apples and cherries, many types of fruits and nuts will grow well in the state.

Peaches

Washington state has ideal weather for growing peach trees. Depending on the part of the state and the climate zone, a number of varieties can thrive, including redhaven, glohaven, red globe, Canadian harmony, reliance, Polly, harken and ranger. Peaches often require between 200 and 1,000 hours of temperatures below 45 degrees Fahrenheit, so it is important to select a variety that will bear well in your particular climate zone. Some varieties will grow better in the colder climate of eastern Washington than in warmer western Washington.

Almonds

Washington state is well suited for growing almonds. Almond trees begin producing nuts after three or four years and can live 20 to 25 years. Most almond trees grown in Washington are sweet almonds and can grow to 20 to 30 feet tall. Almonds can survive short periods of time colder than minus 10 F. Almond orchards should be frost free beginning in February. Almonds are not usually grown commercially in Washington. Most almonds are grown for personal consumption.

Pears

Pears can grow well in some parts of Washington, especially Asian pears. Like almonds, most Asian pears are not grown commercially. Asian pear trees make good landscaping trees that offer fruit for personal consumption. One popular form of Asian pear tree has four or five different varieties of pears grafted onto the same root stock. Each variety ripens at a different time, offering very long bearing seasons from a single, compact tree.

Keywords: Washington state fruit, Washington state nuts, Washington state agriculture

About this Author

Christopher Earle is a freelance writer based in Denver, Colo. He has been writing since 1987 and has written for National Public Radio, the Associated Press, the Boeing Company, Ford New Holland, Microsoft, Active Voice, RAHCO International and Umax Data Systems. He studied creative writing at Mankato State University in Minnesota.

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