How to Propagate Agapanthus by Seed

Overview

Agapanthus are easy-to-grow evergreen, perennial flowering plants that are indigenous to South Africa. Once agapanthus are established, they are very hardy and can tolerate a wide variety of soils making them a staple in many landscaped gardens. Although usually propagated by division, growing agapanthus from seed is easy and they will germinate readily as long as the seeds are fresh.

Germinating Agapanthus Seeds

Step 1

Remove the seed pods from the agapanthus plant in the fall. Set the pods into a paper bag and place the paper bag in an arid environment. Leave the pods in the paper bag until they are dry and turn brown.

Step 2

Split apart the pods and remove the agapanthus seeds. Set the seeds back into a paper bag and store them undisturbed in an arid environment until you can plant them in the spring.

Step 3

Fill up a seed raising flat with a mixture of two parts sand, one part loam and two parts peat moss. Pack down the mixture using the back of a metal spoon, the bottom of a glass or your hands. Mist with water until you are certain it is very well dampened down. It should be moist to the touch, but not so wet it's drippy.

Step 4

Create shallow (1/8 inch) rows in the seed raising flat using the long side of a 12-inch ruler. Space each of the rows approximately 1 1/2 to 2 inches apart from each other.

Step 5

Plant the agapanthus seeds in the rows so they are spaced about 1 inch apart. You can use a pair of forceps or tweezers if you find it difficult to handle the agapanthus seeds. Sprinkle a small amount of the germinating mixture over the agapanthus seeds, approximately 1/8 of an inch.

Step 6

Set the seed raising tray in a warm location that will stay right around 65 to 70 degrees Farenheit. Try and provide approximately six to eight hours of indirect light every day. Avoid direct sunshine, if possible. Germination of agapanhtus seeds will typically being in two to four weeks at the above temperature. Transplant the agapanthus seedlings when they have a set of leaves.

Transplanting Agapanthus Seedlings

Step 1

Pour enough potting mix into 3- or 4-inch plastic pots until they are full to within approximately 1/2 inch from the top of the rim. Pack the potting mix down until it is well compressed.

Step 2

Scoop out an agapanthus seedling from the seed raising flat using a spoon. Use care to dig out the entire root system.

Step 3

Dig out a hole in the center of each pot that will accommodate the roots of an agapanthus seedling and set the agapanthus seedling into the pot. Make sure the agapanthus seedling is sitting in the soil at the same level it is already growing at.

Step 4

Scoop in potting mix around the agapanthus seedling using the spoon. Then, firm down the soil around the agapanthus seedling.

Step 5

Mix 1 tbsp. of starter solution, such as 10-55-10, into 1 gallon of water. Water each of the agapanthus seedlings with this mixture until they are saturated.

Step 6

Transfer the agapanthus seedlings into a location where they will receive at least eight to 10 hours of filtered light every day. Keep the agapanthus seedlings moist, but do not allow them to be so well watered they are dripping wet. Once the agapanthus seedlings are growing and well-established, about two to three months, you can place them into a sun-filled location where they will receive 10 to 12 hours of light every day.

Things You'll Need

  • Agapanthus seeds/pods
  • Paper bags
  • Seed raising flat
  • Sand
  • Loam
  • Peat moss
  • Metal spoon or glass
  • 12-inch ruler
  • Tweezers
  • Spray bottle
  • 3- or 4-inch plastic pots
  • Potting mix
  • Starter solution

References

  • Plants for a Future: Agapanthus
  • Royal Horticultural Society: Agapanthus
  • Floridata: Agapanthus
Keywords: germinating agapanthus seeds, planting agapanthus by seed, growing agapanthus seeds

About this Author

Katelyn Lynn is a certified holistic health practitioner who specializes in orthomolecular medicine and preventative modalities. She also has extensive experience in botany and horticulture. Lynn has been writing articles for various websites relating to health and wellness since 2007. She has been published on gardenguides.com. She is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science in alternative medicine from Everglades University.