How to Care for an Andromeda Plant

Overview

The andromeda plant (Andromeda polifolia), commonly known as bog rosemary, grows in boggy areas and along rivers and streams in cool climates as far north as Alaska and as far south as Idaho and Illinois. The andromeda plant can be recognized with its leathery, sage-green leaves and small bunches of tiny pink or white blooms that appear in late spring. Andromeda is a slow-growing evergreen plant that can grow to heights of approximately 2 feet. Caring for an andromeda plant can be tricky, as it is difficult to replicate the proper cool, boggy growing conditions. The andromeda plant is also known as marsh andromeda.

Step 1

Plant andromeda in sandy, boggy or peaty soil. Although most plants require soil that drains well, the andromeda plant will only grow in soils that retain moisture.

Step 2

Locate the andromeda plant in a cool, shady spot. Andromeda plants require a cool climate and won't tolerate heat.

Step 3

Keep the soil moist, as the soil should never be allowed to dry out. Andromeda plant won't tolerate drought.

Tips and Warnings

  • Although andromeda plants resemble rosemary, andromeda, or bog rosemary, should never be ingested, and should be appreciated only as an ornamental plant. The leaves of the andromeda plant can lower blood pressure, cause vomiting and dizziness and respiratory problems.

Things You'll Need

  • Soil, boggy or peaty
  • Watering source
  • Container (optional)
  • Potting medium (optional)

References

  • University of Washington: Plant Data Sheet: Bog Rosemary (Andromeda polifolia)
  • Michigan State University Extension: Andromeda polifolia--Bog Rosemary
  • NC State University: Scientific Name Andromeda polifolia Common Name Marsh andromeda; Bog-rosemary
Keywords: andromeda plant, bog rosemary, marsh andromeda

About this Author

M.H. Dyer is a long-time writer, editor and proofreader. She has been a contributor to the East-Oregonian Newspaper and See Jane Run magazine, and is author of a memoir, “The Tumbleweed Chronicles, a Sideways Look at Life." She holds an Master of Fine Arts from National University, San Diego.