How to Fertilize a Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar Tree

Overview

Weeping blue atlas cedar, known botanically as Cedrus atlantica Pendula, is an evergreen tree native to the mountainous regions of North Africa. The trees reach up to 15 feet in height at maturity and up to 10 feet in spread with small needle-like foliage that is less than 2 inches in length. The needles have a pronounced blue-green-grey hue and a matte finish. The branches drape back down against or near the trunk as opposed to spreading out or upwards as a typical blue cedar would. Due to their unusual and airy growth form and rich coloration, they are grown almost exclusively as specimen trees in the landscape or as miniature or bonsai trees.

Step 1

Fertilize your weeping blue atlas cedar tree once every other year or every two years in the spring as soon as the soil is thawed, the last frost has passed and the soil can easily be worked. This timing provides nutrients during the tree's peak growth period but fertilizer can be applied up until the middle of July.

Step 2

Determine the square footage of soil surrounding your weeping blue Atlantic cedar and apply up to 2 pounds of a 10-8-6 fertilizer for every 500 square feet of soil space the tree covers.

Step 3

Scatter the fertilizer granules around the root zone of the tree evenly starting at least a foot out from the trunk and extending at least 1 foot past the ends of the widest branches. Nestle the fertilizer into the top 1 to 2 inches of soil with a rake or cultivating fork.

Step 4

Water the fertilizer in well until the soil becomes drenched to a depth of at least 10 inches to begin to percolate the nutrients down towards the cedar roots.

Things You'll Need

  • 10-8-6 granular fertilizer
  • Rake
  • Water

References

  • East Tennesee State University Arboretum: Tree of the Week Blue Atlas Cedar
  • University of Florida IFAS United State Forestry Service: Weeping Atlas Cedar
  • University of Minnesota: Fertilizing Evergreens
Keywords: weeping blue atlas cedar, fertilizing atlas cedar tree, feeding weeping cedar trees

About this Author

An omni-curious communications professional, Dena Kane has more than 17 years of experience writing and editing content for online publications, corporate communications, business clients, industry journals, as well as film and broadcast media. Kane studied political science at the University of California, San Diego.