How to Dry Floral Bouquets

Overview

Traditionally a bride tosses her floral bouquet to the unmarried females attending the reception. Florists often design bouquets so that a portion of it can be retained by the bride as a sentimental keepsake. Floral bouquets from weddings, proms or special events can be dried to preserve the memories and the flowers. If the dried bouquet is placed in a decorative glass jar (with a lid) it can be displayed for years without gathering dust on its petals.

Step 1

Immediately begin the drying procedure. After the event, don't put the bouquet in the refrigerator if you intend to dry the flowers. While refrigeration will preserve the fresh flowers for a few days, they will begin to wilt, which will produce an inferior dried bouquet. The fresher the flowers are when you begin the process, the better the result.

Step 2

Remove any foliage that was damaged during the event, without destroying the overall look of the bouquet. This might be removing a broken leaf or flower bud.

Step 3

Attach the bouquet to a clothes hanger using a clothespin. Hang the bouquet upside down from the bottom of the clothes hanger. If the bouquet is too heavy for the clothespin, attach the bouquet to the clothes hanger using a piece of wire.

Step 4

Hang the clothes hanger in dry, a warm, well ventilated location out of the direct sun. If properly done, the bouquet will be hanging upside down. The clothes hanger might be hung from a hook in the ceiling or wall, a curtain rod or clothesline. Allow the bouquet to hang free, without touching anything. It will take two to three weeks for the flowers to dry.

Things You'll Need

  • Clothes hanger
  • Clothespin

References

  • University of Missouri Extension: Drying Flowers and Foliage for Arrangements
  • Clemens Extension: Drying flowers
Keywords: drying flowers, drying flower bouquet, drying a bouquet

About this Author

Ann Johnson has been a freelance writer since 1995. She previously served as the editor of a community magazine in Southern California and was also an active real estate agent, specializing in commercial and residential properties. She has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from California State University of Fullerton.