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How to Reuse Organic Soil

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How to Reuse Organic Soil

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Overview

If you want to reuse organic soil but are afraid of carrying forward fungus, bacteria or seeds from unwanted weeds, you're going to have to "clean" the soil. To clean your organic soil and make it reusable, all you need is your oven and an afternoon. By baking your soil in the oven you can avoid adding any harsh chemicals to your soil and you'll be able to plant organic seeds or seedlings into it without having to wait for harmful herbicides or fungicides to wear away.

Step 1

Water your soil to moisten it throughout. The soil should form a loose clump when squeezed but break apart easily when poked.

Step 2

Add the soil to a roasting pan up to 4 inches deep. Cover with aluminum foil, pressing the sides of the foil to the pan to wrap up the pan.

Step 3

Push a thermometer through the center of the foil and into the soil. Heat the oven to 180 degrees and put the covered pan into the oven.

Step 4

Wait for the thermometer to reach 180 degrees. Set the timer for 30 minutes after the thermometer reads 180 degrees.

Step 5

Take the pan out of the oven after 30 minutes. Allow the soil to cool before use.

Tips and Warnings

  • Allow your soil to thoroughly cool before planting so you don't burn the roots of the plant or seeds. Many plants and seeds do not respond well to soils over 100 degrees, so cooling to room temperature is essential.

Things You'll Need

  • Used organic soil
  • Clean water
  • Roasting pan
  • Aluminum foil
  • Meat thermometer
  • Oven
  • Timer

References

  • "Success with Seeds"; Chris Wheeler and Valerie Wheeler; 2004
Keywords: reusing organic soil, cleaning organic soil, how to reuse organic soil

About this Author

Margaret Telsch-Williams is a freelance, fiction, and poetry writer from the Blue Ridge mountains. When not writing articles for Demand Studios, she works for WidescreenWarrior.com as a contributor and podcast co-host.

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