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How to Make Organic Insecticide

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How to Make Organic Insecticide

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Overview

Make your own cheap and easy organic insecticide from harmless products already stocked in your kitchen. Everyday vegetable and mineral oils are powerful ingredients when used to formulate homemade insecticides. The process is simple. Soap acts as a surfactant, causing the solution it's mixed with to become stickier. It improves the mixture's ability to adhere to other materials. Water serves to facilitate ease of application. Then the oil finishes off your victims by suffocating them.

Step 1

Pour 2 cups of vegetable or mineral oil into the blender.

Step 2

Add ½ cup dishwashing liquid. Mix on the lowest speed to avoid producing excessive lather. Blend thoroughly.

Step 3

Store the organic insecticidal concentrate in an airtight container in a cool, dark spot indefinitely.

Step 4

Combine 1 tbsp. of concentrate with 1 qt. of water in a sprayer. Apply directly to any insects that you see. Coat all of the plant's foliage and stems thoroughly.

Step 5

Reapply as needed, particularly following rainfall.

Tips and Warnings

  • Don't use this insecticide on palm plants, cyclads, ferns or fuzzy foliage plants, which are easily burned. Don't apply during very hot weather conditions.

Things You'll Need

  • Vegetable or mineral oil
  • Dishwashing liquid
  • Airtight container
  • Sprayer

References

  • ABC Riverina: Homemade White Oil
  • Gardening Know How: How to Make White Oil Insecticide

Who Can Help

  • US.Ayushveda: Make Organic Pesticides at Home
Keywords: homemade insecticide, safe insecticide, kill bug

About this Author

Axl J. Amistaadt began as a part-time amateur freelance writer in 1985, turned professional in 2005, and became a full-time writer in 2007. Amistaadt’s major focus is publishing material for GardenGuides. Areas of expertise include home gardening, horticulture, alternative and home remedies, pets, wildlife, handcrafts, cooking, and juvenile science experiments.