North Carolina Flowering Plants for Vases

There are some varieties of flowers that make better cut flowers than others. These flowers for vases have nice stems and plentiful blooms to make great floral arrangements. For the North Carolina area these cut flowers are hardy in zones 6 through 8.

Larkspur

Consolida ajacis is more commonly known by the names larkspur and annual delphinium. It is from the buttercup family of plants and is an easy-to-grow hummingbird attractor. Its spring-blooming flowers are on 2 to 3 feet tall spikes in the shades of lilac, white, pink and blue. The larkspur has leaves that are bright green and feather-like. Depending on cultivar the plant can be 1 to 3 feet tall. You can plant a larkspur in full sun with supplemental watering and propagate via seed in USDA hardiness zones of 3 through 11.

Purple Coneflower

Echinacea purpurea is more commonly known by the name purple coneflower. It is from the aster/daisy family of plants and is a fast, easy-to-grow perennial. It can get 3 feet tall and 3 feet wide. Leaves are dark green, 3 to 8 inches long, and coarse. Flowers are 3 inches wide, like daisies, and have rose-purple coloring. You can plant a purple coneflower in full sun in any soil and propagate via seed or division in USDA hardiness zones of 3 through 9.

Hyacinth

Hyacinthus orientalis is more commonly known by the names hyacinth and Dutch hyacinth. It is from the lily family and is a fragrant perennial. Leaves are strap-like and shiny. Flowers are funnel-shaped, on 1-foot-tall stalks, in many different colors. Some are fragrant, some are not. Plant a hyacinth in full sun for the north and partial shade in the south. Propagate via offsets in USDA hardiness zones of 3 through 9.

Daffodil

Narcissus spp. is more commonly known by the names daffodil, jonquil, narcissus, or the Easter flower. It is from the amaryllis family and is a fragrant easy to grow perennial that is drought tolerant. Leaves are 6 to 30 inches long and drooping. Flowers are on stalks from 4 to 24 inches tall. Colors are typically yellow or white, but there are some variants. Plant a daffodil in well-drained soil with morning sun and partial afternoon shade. Propagate via seed or bulb division in USDA hardiness zones of 4 through 9.

Shasta Daisy

Leucanthemum x superbum is more commonly known as the Shasta daisy. It is from the aster/daisy family and is a perennial. A white ray flower that has 2- to 5-inch-wide blooms, the plant can get 2 to 3 feet tall and 1 ½ feet wide. Leaves are 8 to 12 inches long and dark green. Plant a Shasta daisy in well-drained, non-acidic soil in full sun or partial shade for zones 8 and 9. Propagate via seed or division in USDA hardiness zones of 5 through 9.

Keywords: North Carolina, flowers for vases, cut flowers

About this Author

Tina Samuels has been a full-time freelance writer for more than 10 years (in health and gardening topics) and a writer for 20 years. She has one book, "A Georgia Native Plant Guide," offered through Mercer University Press. She is happy to be a LIVESTRONG and Gardenguides writer.