How to Prepare Seed Beds for Wheat

Overview

Wheat, one of the largest agricultural crops in the world, grows in many parts of the United States. If you have a large amount of land, you can grow wheat and sell it to a local grainary. Even if you only have a small plot, grow wheat and harvest the seeds to make your own flour or cereal. Wheat grows well in many soil types. Prepare seed beds for wheat, sow your seeds and harvest a wheat crop the following year.

Step 1

Remove rocks, sticks and other debris from the seedbed and apply a weed killer if many weeds are present. By applying a general herbicide in midsummer, you will kill growing weeds before they go to seed. Alternately, if you have a small seedbed, control weeds by frequent picking and turning the soil to expose the weed roots to the air.

Step 2

Till or plow the soil to a depth of at least 6 inches in early summer and plow again when new weeds appear. Controlling weeds is a big part of preparing the soil for planting wheat. Once your wheat is growing, it's difficult to remove new weeds. A farmer may till his wheat fields half a dozen times after summer's harvest and before the fall planting to control new weed growth.

Step 3

Add nutrients to the soil before planting. Take a sample of your soil to your local extension agency for testing a couple of weeks before sowing the wheat. If your soil lacks one or more important nutrients, add them to the soil. Your agency will advise you on what to add and how to apply the fertilizer.

Step 4

Till the soil one more time before planting. This final tilling should result in light, well-drained soil. Farmers switch to a fine plow for this tilling, but you may use a standard tiller and go over the soil in opposite directions.

Step 5

Sow your wheat seeds in the fall with a drill or a seeder. Wheat begins to grow before winter's cold and becomes dormant when the temperatures drop below freezing. In the spring, it will green up and grow quickly.

Things You'll Need

  • Soil sample
  • Wheat seeds
  • Plow or tiller
  • Drill or seeder

References

  • Heirloom Organics: Guide to Growing Wheat
  • Kansas State University: Wheat Production Handbook
  • Bread Info: Planting Wheat in Your Own Backyard
Keywords: wheat seeds, grow wheat, prepare the soil

About this Author

Glyn Sheridan is a freelance writer with published credits in regional and national media. Sheridan specializes in health, fitness, construction and business writing. She is also a past editor of "Kansas Women - Focus on Fitness." Sheridan's education includes marketing and journalism.