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What Flowers Should I Plant in Maryland?

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What Flowers Should I Plant in Maryland?

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The best flowers to plant in Maryland are those native to the area. Generations of the same plants have grown in climate and geography specific to Maryland area and, over time, have developed the traits needed to thrive in the soil and weather conditions. Gardeners in Maryland can choose from a wide range of native flowers, enough to fill any size garden.

Blue Wood Aster

Blue wood aster (Aster cordifolius) grows from 1 to 4 feet tall and produces light green or reddish-brown stems, medium to dark green leaves that grow to 5 inches long and 2 to 3 inches wide, and small flowers that grow in clusters at the ends of the stems. The flower petals are lavender, light blue-violet or white. Blue wood aster likes partial shade and moist to dry soil. The flower attracts bees and butterflies, and the foliage is a favorite meal for rabbits, groundhogs, deer and livestock.

Monkeyflower

Monkeyflower (Mimulus ringens) grows from 1 to 3 feet tall and produces leaves that grow to 4 inches long and 1 inch wide. Moneyflower blooms from mid to late summer with blue-violet, pink or white flowers that are about 1 inch long. The plant prefers full or partial sun and rich, wet soil. Monkeyflower attracts butterflies and bumblebees.

Scarlet Catchfly

Scarlet catchfly (Silene virginica L.) is a carnivorous plant also known as fire pink. The plant grows from 1 to 2 feet tall and produces long, thin, green leaves that turn reddish-green in winter and bright red tube-shaped flowers that grow in clusters at the top of the stems from April through August. It got the name catchfly from the long sticky hairs inside the flowers that trap insects. The scarlet catchfly likes partial shade and dry to moist well-drained soil. Hummingbirds and butterflies are attracted to the nectar, and birds are attracted to the seeds.

White Trillium

White trillium (Trillium grandiflorum) is also known as large-flower wakerobin and large-flowered trillium. The plant grows from 12 to 15 inches tall and produces three large leaves at the top of the stem and one large white flower that turns pink as it ages, above the leaves. It can grow in sun, shade or partial shade and requires soil that is rich and moist.

Keywords: Maryland wildflowers, perennial plants, Maryland plants

About this Author

Regina Sass is based in the Adirondack Region of New York State. She has been a writer for 10 years writing for publications in the real estate and retail industries. Online experience includes writing,advertising and editing for an educational web site. Sass is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.