How to Feed Plants Sugar Water

Overview

The cells inside each plant are miniature factories that produce a sugar known as glucose for energy. This sugar is the byproduct of photosynthesis. Additionally, when you purchase cut flowers, some florists give you a packet that contains glucose and citrus to feed the flowers and help preserve them and hold off wilting. You can make up your own sugar water at home to feed plants in order to boost their blooming and growth.

Step 1

Fill a saucepan with 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil.

Step 2

Add a quarter-cup of sugar to the water. Stir while still boiling with a spoon until dissolved. Then remove the still-boiling water from heat and allow to cool.

Step 3

Add the solution to a watering can. Water plants with sugar water twice monthly by tipping the sugar water into the plant pot until the soil is as saturated as a wrung-out sponge.

Step 4

Save your sugar water in the refrigerator when not in use. This will retard the growth of bacteria.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not water plants with sugar water more than twice monthly. The presence of too much sugar in soil can cause the growth of mold or bacteria in the soil that can harm the roots of your plants. Do not water young plants with sugar water. Watering young plants with sugar water may cause them to absorb less water and die.

Things You'll Need

  • Saucepan
  • Water
  • Sugar
  • Spoon
  • Watering can

References

  • University of Southern California: The Effect of Sugar on Bean Plant Growth
  • Sunset Magazine: How to Feed Plants
  • Innovations Report: Groundbreaking Research Shows Sugar to Trigger Growth

Who Can Help

  • Growing Edge Magazine: How Does Sugar Water Affect the Growth in Plants?
Keywords: plant health, feeding flowers, glucose solution

About this Author

After 10 years experience in writing, Tracy S. Morris has countless articles and two novels to her credit. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets" and "CatFancy," as well as the "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World," and several websites.