How to Get Rid of Mint Plants

Overview

Mint is one of those herbs that is useful in the kitchen. You can make mojitos, mint tea, dried mint, and roasted lamb with mint, salsa with mint to name a few, but in the garden, watch out as it will try to spread over your whole yard. One way to remedy this problem in the future is to grow it in containers. If you no longer want to have mint popping up every spring, there are a few things you can do to get rid of it. Some people consider it an aggressive weed as it will creep out of its original spot.

Step 1

Mow over the mint if it is in your lawn. If you keep mowing it, it will never grow high enough to produce enough leaves to support the plant. For a while, you will still see the mint, but after a while, it will disappear.

Step 2

Pull it up. This is one of the most effective ways to get rid of mint, but understand how mint grows before you start. The mint plant sends out underground runners or stolons. These stolons develop nodes, like buds on a tree. If you just break off a section of a stolon, new nodes will develop and more stolons will be produced. When you pull it up, wait until the soil is moist, then dig under the roots so you can lift up whole sections. You might leave a section here and there, but if you consistently pull it up, it will soon be gone.

Step 3

Spray it with a broadleaf herbicide. Do not spray around other edible plants or herbs without reading all the warnings and precautions listed on the product you choose. Several chemicals have 85 to 100 percent effectiveness with mint. They are bromoxynil, oxyfluorfen, diuron, trifluralin, paraquat. Be careful when you spray these herbicides not to overspray onto plants you wish to keep.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Gloves
  • Pruning shears
  • Herbicide (broadleaf)

References

  • Pacific Northwest Weed Management Handbook : Herbicide Effectiveness in Mint
  • NSW: Commodity Growing Guides
Keywords: growing mint, pulling up mint, herbicide for mint

About this Author

Based in Maryland, Heidi Braley, currently writes for local and online media outlets. Some of Braley's articles from the last 10 years are in the "Oley Newsletter," "Connections Magazine," GardenGuides and eHow.com. Braley's college life included Penn State University and Villanova University with her passions centered in nutrition and botany.