How to Care for Anise Hyssop Plants

Overview

Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) looks similar to its cousins in the mint family, even if it smells more like anise. Dried anise hyssop blooms are a culinary treat crumbled over a tossed or fruit salad or brewed in tea. In the garden, anise hyssop can grow as tall as 5 feet, and will produce blue flowers that can be used in cut flower arrangements, or left in the herb garden for happy honeybees. Once planted, anise hyssop will require very little care.

Step 1

Plant anise hyssop in full sunlight, and in soil that doesn't puddle after it rains. Although anise hyssop will grow in poor soil, it won't grow in soggy, damp soil. If the soil tends to be damp, improve the drainage and soil quality by adding 3 to 4 inches of compost or peat moss. No additional fertilizer is required.

Step 2

Allow the soil to dry out before watering anise hyssop. Anise hyssop needs about an inch of water per week, either from supplemental watering or from rain.

Step 3

Pull weeds around anise hyssop so the plant won't have to compete for available soil moisture and nutrients. Apply a 1-inch layer of organic mulch such as dry leaves, bark mulch or pine needles around the anise hyssop plants to help keep weeds under control, and retain soil moisture.

Step 4

Harvest buds for drying or kitchen use just before they are fully blooming to retain the best aroma and flavor. Never harvest when the plant is wet, or on dewy mornings. Remove any wilted blooms to encourage continuous blooming throughout the growing season.

Things You'll Need

  • Compost or peat moss
  • Organic mulch

References

  • NC State University: Scientific Name Agastache foeniculum Common Name Anise hyssop
  • The Herb Companion: Herb to Know: Anise Hyssop
  • Fernlea Flowers: Agastache hybrid
Keywords: anise hyssop, anise hyssop plants, herb garden

About this Author

M.H. Dyer is a long-time writer, editor and proofreader. She has been a contributor to the East-Oregonian Newspaper and See Jane Run magazine, and is author of a memoir, “The Tumbleweed Chronicles, a Sideways Look at Life." She holds an Master of Fine Arts from National University, San Diego.