How to Wire Hedge Apples to a Wreath

Overview

Hedge apples are known by a variety of names, including horse apples, Osage oranges, monkey balls and bodark fruit. Hedge apples are the fruit of the Osage orange tree, a tree that is native to the Red River Valley area of northern Texas and southern Oklahoma. The Osage orange tree is notable for its dense, thorny branches. Because of this, the trees were planted across the country in close rows for fencing prior to the invention of barbed wire. Today hedge apples are saved and used in decoration. These unusual, knobby green, ball-shaped fruits can be placed in bowls or tied to wreaths in the style of the Williamsburg or Della Robbia wreath.

Step 1

Insert the pointed end of a bamboo floral pick deep into the center of your hedge apple. The end of the pick with attached wire should be left to stick out the end of the hedge apple.

Step 2

Coat the base of the pick with hot glue. This will help to secure the hedge apple to the pick and to seal the wound against rotting.

Step 3

Arrange your hedge apple in the place where you want it on your wreath form.

Step 4

Twist the wire onto the wreath form to secure the hedge apple in place.

Things You'll Need

  • Wreath form
  • Bamboo floral picks with wire
  • Hedge apples
  • Hot glue gun

References

  • Hedgeapple.com: Fruit of the Osage Orange Tree, the HedgeApple
  • Iowa State University: Facts and Myths Associated With Hedge Apples
  • "Colonial Williamsburg Journal"; Deck the Doors; Mary Miley Theobald and Libbey H. Oliver; December 2005

Who Can Help

  • "Colonial Williamsburg Journal"; Deck the Doors
  • The Artful Crafter: Making Wreaths for All Purposes
  • "Woman's Day"; Faux "Sugared" Citrus Wreath
Keywords: decorating with fruit, horse apples, Osage orange tree

About this Author

After 10 years experience in writing, Tracy S. Morris has countless articles and two novels to her credit. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets" and "CatFancy," as well as the "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World," and several websites.