How to Prepare Cut Valerian Root

Overview

Valerian is a popular alternative remedy for insomnia and anxiety. It has been used since as early as the second century for insomnia. Its popularity expanded to the United States and Europe in the mid 1800s. The root of valerian is used for improving sleep quality and the time it takes to fall asleep. Valerian is popular in many supplements and remedies. You can prepare your own using the dried and cut valerian root.

Step 1

Put 1 1/2 cups of water in a saucepan and bring it to a boil.

Step 2

Reduce the heat to medium once your water begins to boil. Place your cut valerian root in a coffee grinder or use a mortar and pestle to grind it to a fine powder. Use your mortar and pestle by firmly rolling the pestle over the root. Measure 2 tsp. of the powdered valerian root and put it in your tea ball.

Step 3

Place the tea ball in the saucepan of boiling water. Cover the saucepan with a lid and let the valerian steep for 15 to 20 minutes. Strain the liquid through a straining cloth to remove any sediment.

Step 4

Add 1 tsp. of St. John's wort, chamomile or passionflower to add extra flavor to your tea.

Step 5

Sweeten your tea to taste with honey and lemon. Sip 1 cup of valerian root tea slowly to feel the effects.

Tips and Warnings

  • Valerian root may cause an upset stomach, headache, uneasiness or dizziness. Long-term use could lead to insomnia. Consult a doctor before using valerian for medical conditions.

Things You'll Need

  • Saucepan
  • Valerian root
  • Coffee grinder or mortar and pestle
  • Tea ball
  • Straining cloth
  • Honey
  • Lemon

References

  • Medline Plus: Valerian
  • Insomnia Treatments & Cures: Drink Tea to Relieve Your Insomnia
  • Planet Rx: Valerian Root

Who Can Help

  • California Fermentation Society: Brewing Botanicals
Keywords: medicinal tea, valerian root uses, valerian tea

About this Author

Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Robin Coe has reported on a variety of subjects for over 15 years. Coe is the former publisher of the politics and art magazine Flesh from Ashes. She has worked to protect water and air quality. Coe holds a Bachelor of Science in journalism with a double-major in international politics from Bowling Green State University.