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How to Kill Moss in a Pond

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How to Kill Moss in a Pond

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Overview

Pond moss is a serious problem of small private lake owners. If allowed to grow, pond moss will block out the sunlight, cause increased levels of sediment in the water and make it difficult for fish to find their pray. When fish cannot find their food, they become stunted and less desirable for catching. Thankfully, natural ways exist to effectively and efficiently kill moss in a pond without harming fish or other plant life.

Step 1

Remove the top layer of the moss with a mechanical pond weed cutter. The top layer will have strands of moss floating along the surface. The strands will look like long pieces of rope. Cut the strands by inserting the mechanical weed cutter into the water and passing it over the strand area.

Step 2

Remove the moss strands by raking them toward the boat and pulling them on board. Always remove the cut strands, as they will otherwise sink to the bottom of the lake and re-root.

Step 3

Obtain some Triloid grass carp and introduce them into your lake. These carp eat any and all vegetative matter in a lake and over time will kill the moss entirely. Speak with your local county fish and game office to verify the necessary number for your sized lake, as these fish live for roughly 10 years and consume very large amounts of plants.

Things You'll Need

  • Mechanical pond weed cutters
  • Water rake
  • Triploid grass carp

References

  • Texas Agrilife Extension: What Can I Do About Pond Moss
Keywords: pond moss, kill pond moss, triploid grass carp

About this Author

Ann White is a freelance journalist with prior experience as a Corporate and Business Attorney and Family Law Mediator. She has written for multiple university newspapers and has published over 300 articles for publishers such as EHow and Garden Guides. White earned her Juris Doctor from Thomas Jefferson School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in English literature.