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How to Reseed Crimson Clover Seed

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How to Reseed Crimson Clover Seed

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Overview

Crimson clover makes a good cover crop that will retain soil and place organic matter back into the ground. Best planted in the fall, approximately 40 days prior to the first killing frost, the clover will tolerate mildly cold weather. If the clover is left to a full bloom in late spring, the flowers will produce enough seed to reseed the area naturally. If for some reason the clover is mowed over or plowed under, the clover will have to be reseeded the next fall for a new cover crop.

Step 1

Spread the clover seed over the field at a rate of 10 pounds to 20 pounds per acre. The nighttime temperature should be less than 60 degrees F for the best germination. The soil must also contain some moisture but not be extremely wet.

Step 2

Attach a disc plow to the rear of the tractor. Disc the seed into the soil. The seeds will do well if they are planted to a depth of ¼ inch to ½ inch.

Step 3

Allow two weeks to pass before contemplating adding more seed to the field. Typically by this time the clover seed should break the ground, and small leaves should have formed on the plants.

Step 4

Broadcast the seed into areas that have poor germination. Do not disc plow the seeds into place, as the mechanical equipment will kill the plants that have already come up.

Step 5

Work the seeds into the soil using the garden rake. Rake the soil areas where the reseed has been broadcasted, taking care not to go over areas that have small clover plants established.

Things You'll Need

  • Seed spreader
  • Crimson clover seed (10 pounds to 20 pounds per acre)
  • Tractor
  • Disc plow
  • Garden rake

References

  • Michigan State University: Crimson Clover
  • North Carolina State University: Annual Cover Crops
Keywords: reseed clover, cover crop, organic matter, crimson clover seed, winter annuals

About this Author

G. K. Bayne is a freelance writer, currently writing for Demand Studios where her expertise in back-to-basics, computers and electrical equipment are the basis of her body of work. Bayne began her writing career in 1975 and has written for Demand since 2007.