How to Save Aloe Vera Plants

Overview

Aloe vera not only makes an excellent ornamental plant, it also can be grown and used for medicinal purposes, such as for treatments for burns and acne. Aloe vera, like a cactus, is a succulent plant that retains moisture in its foliage. While aloe vera is easy to grow and care for, sometimes your plant may begin to look unhealthy. Fortunately, sometimes with just one change, your aloe vera plant can be restored to health.

Step 1

Move your potted aloe vera plant to a sunny location. If indoors, a south- or west-facing window will provide the most direct sunlight. If outdoors, set the pot where it will receive lots of sun, while not being exposed to high winds. If your aloe vera plants are planted outdoors, prune nearby trees or shrubs to help give them more sunlight.

Step 2

Allow the soil to dry out between waterings. Test the soil with your finger, and when it feels dry as deep as your finger will go, from spring until fall, water it until the water seeps out the bottom. In the winter, when the soil dries out, only water it with one to two cups of water.

Step 3

Re-pot your aloe vera plant into a larger, wider pot. Use fresh all-purpose potting soil and lay a 1- to 2-inch layer of gravel at the bottom of the pot for better water drainage. Aloe vera roots grow wide rather than deep, so your plant may just need more room.

Step 4

Fertilize your aloe vera plant in the spring with a fertilizer labeled for succulents (usually a 10-40-10 fertilizer will suffice). Follow the dosing instructions on the label.

Things You'll Need

  • Pot
  • Potting soil
  • Fertilizer

References

  • The Garden Helper: How to Grow and Care for Aloe Plants
  • Arizona Cooperative Extension: Growing Aloe Vera
Keywords: save aloe vera plant, revive aloe plant, water aloe plant

About this Author

Melissa Lewis graduated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and is a former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist. She has written over 20 episodes for the radio drama entitled "A Work in Progress." She also writes for several online outlets, including Gardenguides, Travels and Examiner, and is currently finalizing a movie script to be filmed in 2010.