How to Raise Aloe Vera Plants?

Overview

Aloe vera plants are easy to raise, requiring no special care and only the occasional watering. They do best in bright sunlight and don't tolerate temperatures below 45 degrees. For this reason, in most parts of the country aloe vera is raised as a houseplant. Aloe vera is a popular remedy for sunburn and skin rashes. The slightly sticky gel inside each leaf soothes the skin and, according to the National Institutes of Health, studies have shown aloe vera can help promote healing of the skin.

Step 1

Obtain a young aloe vera plant from a store or from a friend. Aloe vera plants multiply by sending up multiple small shoots, known as pups. These pups can be easily transplanted.

Step 2

Plant your aloe in a pot with good drainage, in an all-purpose potting soil or a soil made especially for cactus.

Step 3

Set your aloe vera in a sunny window. South- or west-facing windows are best. In summer, you can set the pots on a deck or balcony in full sun.

Step 4

Water sparingly, only when the leaves began to look less full. Don't allow the pots to sit in water. If the leaves of your aloe vera turn yellow or droop you may be giving the plant too much water.

Step 5

Separate all the new pups from around the parent plants once a year. Transplant the pups to other pots.

Tips and Warnings

  • Raw aloe vera contains compounds that are strong laxatives. Don't allow children or pets to eat aloe vera.

Things You'll Need

  • Potting soil or cactus potting soil
  • Pots

References

  • Arizona State University: Raising Aloe Vera
  • National Institutes of Health: Aloe Vera

Who Can Help

  • University of Florida: Aloe Vera
Keywords: aloe vera plant, aloe vera gel, raw aloe vera

About this Author

Cynthia James is the author of more than 40 novels and her nonfiction work has appeared in publications ranging from Modern Bride to Popular Mechanics. A graduate of Sam Houston State University, she has a degree in economics. Before turning to freelancing full time, James worked as a newspaper reporter, travel agent and medical clinic manager.