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How to Dry Artichoke Flowers

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How to Dry Artichoke Flowers

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Overview

While there are many ways to dry flowers, air drying is the method recommended for artichoke flowers, according to "Preserving Flowers and Foliage", on the University of Kentucky, College of Agriculture's website. The artichoke flower is actually the artichoke fruit that has be left on the plant and allowed to come to full flower. The dried artichoke flower can be used in floral arrangements or craft projects.

Step 1

Cut the flower from the plant using gardening shears, leaving as much of the stem as possible attached to the flower. Don't use a flower if it looks wilted, faded or limp. An immature flower or one at its prime is the best for drying.

Step 2

Remove any foliage by cutting at its end near the stem.

Step 3

Secure one end of the twine to the flower by tying a knot around the stem.

Step 4

Tie the other end of the twine to a hook in the ceiling or doorway, or another area so that the flower will hang upside down from the string. Choose a dry, warm, ventilated area that is not in the direct sunlight.

Step 5

Leave hanging for two to three weeks or until dry. Drying times vary, depending on humidity factors.

Things You'll Need

  • Gardening shears
  • 3- or 4-foot piece of twine

References

  • University of Kentucky College of Agriculture: Preserving Flowers and Foliage
  • Alabama Cooperative Extension: Drying and Preserving Flowers
Keywords: artichoke flower, drying artichoke flowers, drying artichokes

About this Author

Ann Johnson was the editor of a community magazine in Southern California for more than 10 years and was an active real estate agent, specializing in commercial and residential properties. She has a Bachelors of Art degree in communications from California State University of Fullerton. Today she is a freelance writer and photographer, and part owner of an Arizona real estate company.

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