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Home Remedy to Kill Moss

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Home Remedy to Kill Moss

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Overview

Moss is a very simple plant with no roots, stems or leaves. These plants typically grow together in dense mats or clumps. Because of moss' habit of becoming established on older rock and stones, it may be treated as a decorative plant that makes ornamental garden art look aged. However, some gardeners find moss an unsightly nuisance, especially if it is growing on the lawn. Because moss is a simple plant, it is simple to get rid of.

Step 1

Rake the soil under which the moss is growing. This will break up the moss and aerate the soil beneath it, creating an environment inhospitable to moss.

Step 2

Select a fertilizer that uses iron sulfate, and apply it to the lawn. Compounds such as this will kill moss, as well as causing grass to grow and crowd out moss.

Step 3

Mix a solution of dish detergent and water and pour into a spray bottle. Spray the moss with this solution daily until it begins to yellow and die.

Step 4

Pour vinegar into a spray bottle and spray on moss. Vinegar is acidic in pH. Acidic liquids kill moss.

Step 5

Prune vegetation around the moss so that it receives sunlight. Moss cannot live under sunny conditions.

Things You'll Need

  • Rake
  • Fertilizer containing iron sulfate
  • Dish detergent
  • Vinegar
  • Spray bottle

References

  • Washington State University: Frequently Asked Questions About Lawns
  • Oregon State Extension: Controlling Moss in Lawns

Who Can Help

  • UC Botanical Garden: Chemical-Free Moss Killer?
Keywords: killing moss, unwanted plants, natural weed killer

About this Author

After 10 years experience in writing, Tracy S. Morris has countless articles and two novels to her credit. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets" and "CatFancy," as well as the "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World," and several websites.

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