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How to Dry Flowers to Make Note Paper

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How to Dry Flowers to Make Note Paper

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Overview

Paper with dried flowers is sophisticated and classy, and adds an elegant touch to your stationery. It is basically paper that contains dried pressed flowers in whole, or their petals, that is used for cards or letters. It can also be made into boxes, picture frames and even lamps. Although it is available at stationery stores (for a price), with a few inexpensive materials, you can easily make this specialty paper in your own home to add a personal touch to your correspondence.

Step 1

Pick the flowers of your choice late in the morning, after the dew has dried. These can be wild flowers or those purchased from a florist. Also include foliage such as baby's breath or a few leaves. It is best to select thin, delicate flowers, as those with woody stems or large pods take considerable time to dry out. Beginners commonly use buttercups, pansies and Queen Anne's lace.

Step 2

Cut off the flowers stems with scissors; collect all the stems in a bowl and discard.

Step 3

Open a large, heavy book, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia, to the middle. Place a sheet of white construction or absorbent paper over the lower page, and spread the flowers and foliage, if any, on it. This paper will prevent the flowers from giving out color onto the pages of the book. Space the flowers so they do not overlap or touch one another.

Step 4

Cover the flowers with another sheet of construction or absorbent paper. Gently press the paper down and close the book. Place another heavy book or two on top to apply the required pressure to dry and press the flowers.

Step 5

Check the flowers after ten days. Carefully open the book and lift the top construction paper. Small flowers should have dried by this time, but if you notice large flowers still retain traces of moisture, close the book again and leave it for another week to ten days.

Things You'll Need

  • Small flowers with flat petals
  • Scissors
  • Bowl
  • Heavy, weighty books
  • Two sheets of white construction paper

References

  • "Pioneer Thinking: Pressed Flowers"
  • "OAK Corral: How to Project"
  • "Preserved Gardens: Pressed Flowers"
Keywords: drying flowers, note paper, dry flowers art

About this Author

Tanya Khan is a freelance author and consultant, having written hundreds of thousands of words for various online and print sources. She has an MBA in Marketing but her passion lies in giving her words wings.

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