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How to Dry Flowers in Sand

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How to Dry Flowers in Sand

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Overview

You can use dried flowers in a variety of art and craft projects or in dry floral arrangements. An inexpensive method of drying flowers is by using sand--fine-grade builder's sand or sand found along the seashore both will work. When drying flowers, take the cuttings when flowers are in their prime.

Step 1

Layer the bottom of the box with several sheets of newspaper.

Step 2

Pour about 1/2 inch of dry sand evenly inside the box, atop the newspaper. Level the sand.

Step 3

Arrange the flowers face down on the sand.

Step 4

Cover the flowers gently with more sand. The sand will be heavy, so add it slowly to avoid crushing or breaking the flowers. Add only enough sand to cover the flowers completely, no more. Let the box sit undisturbed for a week to 10 days.

Step 5

Move the box outside to an area where you can dump the sand. Punch holes in the bottom of the box so that the sand gradually drains out.

Step 6

Remove the flowers gently when the sand is finished draining from the box.

Tips and Warnings

  • Don't try to pull the flowers from the sand, as they will likely break or be crushed. This is not the best method for drying fragile flowers, as the sand is heavy and can easily crush them.

Things You'll Need

  • Cardboard box
  • Newspaper

References

  • West Virginia University Extension: Preserving Flowers for Year Round Use
Keywords: drying flowers sand, dried flower technique, dry petals with sand

About this Author

Ann Johnson was the editor of a community magazine in Southern California for more than 10 years and was an active real estate agent, specializing in commercial and residential properties. She has a Bachelors of Art degree in communications from California State University of Fullerton. Today she is a freelance writer and photographer, and part owner of an Arizona real estate company.