Zone 10 Shade Plants

Zone 10 on the USDA Plant Hardiness Map includes south Florida and south, inland California. Temperatures in these regions usually don't go below 30 degrees, thus frost is not usually a problem. Given the high heat and/or humidity in these areas, most plants will need ample watering, but there are are hundreds of plants that will thrive in this climate.

Elephant Ears

Though these plants need plenty of water and shade, Elephant Ears (Colocasia esculenta) require very little additional care, according to FloridaYards.org. They are fast growing, can reach 10 feet tall and have a spread of up to 2 feet. Large, green leaves unfurl from individual stalks. This perennial is not frost tolerant, and will die back after a freeze, but it will grow back in warmer weather. Elephant Ears require slightly acidic and alkaline soil.

Impatiens

Impatiens are colorful, low flowers which thrive in the shade and scatter seeds for propagation. These flowers, which are available in reds, pinks and whites, enjoy moist soil, according to FlordaYards.org. Impatiens grow to about 1 foot high and can have a spread of about 1 foot. The soil should be slightly alkaline and slightly acidic. These are excellent potted plants, and attract butterflies.

Ivy

The ivy known as Algerian or Canary (Hedera canariensis), which has a small green leaf with a white border, thrives in the shade and adds depth and interest to a garden bed or container combination. Ivy can grow to 1 foot tall, but this fast-growing vine can also grow to 6 feet long and may become invasive. It is important to keep ivy properly trimmed. Ivy thrives in the shade with average watering. The soil should be slightly alkaline and acidic.

Keywords: South Florida shade plants, Inland California shade plants, Elephant ears

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J.D.Chi is a professional journalist who has covered sports for more than 20 years at newspapers all over the U.S. She has covered major golf tournaments and the NFL as well as writing about travel, health and other issues. Chi received her bachelor's degree in professional writing from Carnegie Mellon University and is working toward her master's in journalism.