Landscape Plant Names

Many common plants are used for landscaping, including flowers, foliage plants, shrubs, trees, palms and grasses. Landscape plants that you pick for your lawn will incorporate personal taste while keeping in mind the soil type and the sun conditions for the area you live in.

Flowering Dogwood

The flowering dogwood, Cornus florida, is a tree from the dogwood family that reaches 30 feet tall and 35 feet wide on occasion with an average of 15 feet tall and 15 feet wide. It has medium green leaves 3 to 6 inches long with white or pink flowers. Berries are red in winter. Grow a flowering dogwood in partial shade but it can tolerant some full sun conditions. Propagate via cuttings or seed in USDA hardiness zones of 5 to 9.

Southern Magnolia

The southern magnolia, Magnolia grandiflora, is a tree from the magnolia family that is fragrant, evergreen, and drought tolerant. It gets 60 to 90 feet high with broad glossy leaves 5 to 8 inches long. Flowers are 8 to 12 inches wide and white. The blooms are fragrant and stay through spring and summer. Grow a southern magnolia in full sun or partial shade in acidic soils. Propagate via seed, cuttings, or grafting in USDA hardiness zones of 7 to 9.

Tulip

The tulip, Tulipa spp., is a perennial from the lily family that gets various sizes and shapes depending on the cultivar. Flowers are cup like with many different colors and basal (close to the base of a stem) leaves. Grow a tulip in non-acidic soil in full sun. Propagate via bulb division in USDA hardiness zones of 4 to 10.

Rose of Sharon

The rose of Sharon, Hibiscus syriacus, is a shrub from the mallow family that gets 6 to 10 feet high and 3 to 5 feet wide. Leaves are dark green and flowers are flared in colors pink, purple, blue or white. Blooms get 3 inches wide. The specifics of a rose of Sharon shrub are according to the cultivar selected. Grow a rose of Sharon in fertile soil in full sun or shifting shade. Propagate via cuttings or seed in USDA hardiness zones of 5 to 9.

Florida Flame Azalea

The Florida flame azalea, Rhododendron austrinum, is a shrub from the heath family that is fragrant and attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies. It gets 6 to 8 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Flowers are yellow and trumpet like 1 ½ to 2 inches long. The blooms smell like honeysuckles and are in spring. Grow a Florida flame azalea in acidic soil with partial sun to shade. Propagate via clump division or seed in USDA hardiness zones of 6 to 10.

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About this Author

Tina Samuels has been a full-time freelance writer for more than 10 years, concentrating on health and gardening topics, and a writer for 20 years. She has written for "Arthritis Today," "Alabama Living," and "Mature Years," as well as online content. She has one book, “A Georgia Native Plant Guide,” offered through Mercer University; others are in development.