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How to Kill Grape Vines

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How to Kill Grape Vines

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Overview

Grape vines can be a problem for those who have trees or other plants in their garden that they want to protect. Wild vines that grow in cleared sections of forest can be particularly bothersome, choking off new trees and collapsing old ones by pulling down on the canopy and growing inside of the tree. The growing season is from early spring to the end of summer, and grape vines grow quickly and must be attended to early in the year.

Step 1

Cut all visible grape vines so that they are 4 to 5 feet long so that you can easily see which vines have been cut and which are left. Cut the vines again as close to the ground as possible.

Step 2

Spread an herbicide around the area that the grape vines are growing in to help disintegrate the roots underground. Use an herbicide such as RoundUp, Weedone or Tordon according to the instructions supplied with the product. Apply herbicide in early March or mid-September, so that the vines are not bleeding sap, ensuring the herbicide takes hold.

Step 3

Place a canopy over the treated area of grape vines to keep the grape vines from getting any sunlight. Grape vines require sunlight to grow and survive, and shading an area will prevent new seedlings from growing.

Things You'll Need

  • Shears
  • Machete
  • Gloves
  • Safety glasses
  • Herbicide

References

  • Tennessee State: Grapevines
  • Washtenaw: Grapevine Cutting
  • Crawford Conservation: Cut Your Grapevines
Keywords: grape vines, kill grape vines, wild vines

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.