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How to Kill Wasps Using Soap & Lemon

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How to Kill Wasps Using Soap & Lemon

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Overview

If you have a wasp nest in one of your trees it can be a dangerous hazard to your yard and home, especially if you have children or pets that often play outdoors. Using pesticides to control the wasps can also be a risk to your pets and environment. Before you consider calling a professional to remove the nest, you should try some homemade methods that will kill wasps. If you can trap the wasps in a mixture of soap and water, then the soap will slowly kill the wasps. Also, many people use a little lemon or vinegar to deter other insects coming into the trap.

Step 1

Cut off the top of a 2-liter bottle with a sharp knife. Add cool water to the bottle to fill it up half way.

Step 2

Add at least 2 tbsp. of dishwashing soap and 1/4 cup of lemon juice to the water. Stir the mixture together.

Step 3

Remove the lid from the top you cut off and then coat the neck of the lid with jam, jelly or honey. Place the top part upside down into the bottle. Use tape to hold this portion in its place.

Step 4

Place the homemade trap at least 300 yards from the wasp nest. Make sure that it cannot be knocked over; place it on an object so that it's at least 4 inches above the ground.

Step 5

Empty out your trap every day. If you wait too long to remove the wasps, then it will become too full of floating wasps. Add more water, soap and lemon juice when it gets low.

Things You'll Need

  • 2-liter bottle
  • Knife
  • Tape
  • 2 tbsp. dishwashing soap
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice

References

  • EarthEasy.com: Natural Wasp Control
  • TipNut.com: Wasp Stings: Treatments & Home Remedies
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: Some Natural Pesticide Alternatives
Keywords: kill wasps, dishwashing soap, lemon juice

About this Author

Greg Lindberg is a graduate of Purdue University with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree in creative writing. His professional writing experience includes three years of technical writing for an agriculture IT department and a major pharmaceutical company, as well as four years as staff writer for a music and film webzine.